Please Note: This Article is 4 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

Question: Re-selling Fuel. My landlord is re-selling me electricity through his own meter and I suspect he may be overcharging me for it. What can I do?

Answer: The Office of Gas & Electricity Markets (Ofgem) introduced new legislation in January 2003 which governs the maximum resale price (MRP) of electricity and gas to domestic (residential) tenants. These include all residential tenancy situations, holiday lets, park homes and house boats.

However, landlords supplying energy to commercial premises (i.e. shops, offices & factory units) are exempt from this law.

The new legislation means that a reseller must only charge per unit of electricity what they themselves actually pay for it – they cannot make a profit.

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All electricity meters used for either domestic or commercial applications must conform to current European regulations. These standards for meters manufactured in the UK are governed by Ofgem (The Office of Gas & Electricity Markets).

ALL meters used for billing MUST conform to the European standard BS EN61036 and backed up with formal Approval Documentation.

See Also:

Re-selling Electricity – Landlord Guidance from Ofgem

Re-Selling Electricity and Gas – A landlord Guide

Note: never rely totally on these standard answers. Before taking action or not, always seek professional advice with the full facts of the case and all documents to hand. LandlordZONE.co.uk

By Tom Entwistle,

LandlordZONE®

If you have any questions about any of the issues here, post your question to the LandlordZONE® Forums – these are the busiest Rental Property Forums in the UK – you will have an answer in no time at all.

©LandlordZONE All Rights Reserved – never rely totally on these general guidelines which apply primarily to England and Wales. They are not definitive statements of the law. Before taking action or not, always do your own research and/or seek professional advice with the full facts of your case and all documents to hand.

Please Note: This Article is 4 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

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