Future of Renting:

A Parliamentary event considering a collection of studies looking to the future of the private rented sector (PRS) was attended by the Secretary of State for Housing last week.

The essays* presented were provided by organisations including Shelter, the Chartered Institute of Housing, the Institute for Public Policy Research and Crisis, representing tenants, landlords, enforcing bodies and various think tanks. They were all looking ahead to where they feel the sector should be heading over the next 20 years.

The landmark even, underlining the importance of the industry to government, was co-ordinated by the Residential Landlords Association (RLA). It was an event to mark the RLA’s 20th anniversary held in the House of Commons.

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Speaking at the event was the Housing Secretary, James Brokenshire MP and the Shadow Housing Secretary, John Healey MP.

All the presented essays recognised the importance of a thriving private rental market that works for both tenants and landlords.

There were calls made for reforms to improve the ability to secure swift and effective justice in the minority of cases, where things go wrong between the landlord and tenant.

Alan Ward, Chair of the RLA said:

“The RLA’s 20th anniversary provides an opportunity to take stock of where the private rented sector now is, and where we all want it to go.

“All the contributors recognise the importance of the sector in providing homes to many millions of people. As we go forward we need to ensure the sector works for tenants and good landlords alike, whilst rooting out the criminals who have no place in a modern rental market.”

The Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, said:

“I want to congratulate the Residential Landlord’s Association on 20 years of hard work helping make the private rented sector better for everyone.

“This is a vision shared by government and is why we have taken action to raise standards in the sector and protect tenants from substandard accommodation and unfair charges.

“There is much more still to be done to ensure everyone has a decent and safe home and I look forward to continuing our work alongside the RLA in the months and years to come.”

Labour MP, Karen Buck, a Vice Chair of the All Party Group for the Private Rented Sector commented:

“My work on housing has brought me into increasing contact with the Residential Landlords Association. I have found them to be constructive, engaged, highly professional and a source of excellent information.”

Meanwhile, Housing Minister Kit Malthouse MP was speaking at the Residential Property (RESI) Conference 2018, a conference for residential property developers, investors, landlords, and house builders held in Newport, South Wales. Mr Malthouse spoke about the future of the industry and he emphasised the importance of meeting housebuilding targets and the impact that technological change will have on the industry in the near future. You can read the full text of his speech here

*The Essays:

  • Essays on the future of the PRS were provided by Anne Godfrey (Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Environmental Health), Jon Sparkes (Chief Executive, Crisis), Luke Murphy, (Associate Director, Institute for Public Policy Research), Mark Littlewood (Director General, Institute for Economic Affairs), Martin Partington (Chair, The Dispute Service), Melanie Leech, (Chief Executive, British Property Federation), Polly Neate (Chief Executive, Shelter), Terrie Alafat (Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Housing), David Smith (Policy Director, Residential Landlords Association) and Professor Kenneth Gibb (Director, UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence).
  • The essays presented can be accessed online at: rla.org.uk/futurePRSessays.

1 COMMENT

  1. Thankfully the rentals are booming. It is fantastic for landlords. The new regulations imposed on homeowners seeking to let out their units are expected and manageable. Great post about the betterment of the private renting sector!

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