Haringey Council has announced the lofty ambition of helping its residents live more fulfilled lives by introducing a selective licensing scheme.

The scheme is so huge that it will need approval from the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, with a likely start date in 2022. The council says there would be approximately 36,000 PRS properties within the scheme, which would raise an annual revenue of £4.32 million or £21.6 million over the scheme’s duration.

The London borough has started a consultation into the plan which will cover much of its rapidly-growing PRS stock. Its own consultation shows that two thirds of landlords in the borough oppose it.

Haringey wants to introduce selective licensing in 14 of its 19 wards, which would include Northumberland Park, White Hart Lane, Bounds Green, Bounds Grove, Harringay, Hornsey, Noel Park, Seven Sisters, St Anns, Stroud Green, Tottenham Hale, Tottenham Green, West Green and Woodside.

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Haringey has reported an increase in poor property conditions, poor landlord management, anti-social behaviour and deprivation in these areas.

It aims to remove the barriers for those residents living in the PRS facing inequality by improving property conditions, property management and driving up standards.

Streetscapes

Its report declares: “By reducing anti-social behaviour and creating more attractive streetscapes, it will contribute to making Haringey a safer, cleaner, and more attractive borough. And ensuring that homes are safe, warm and in good condition will help Haringey’s residents, young and old, live more fulfilled, happy and healthy lives.”

All properties in the area that are privately rented to single households (or two sharers) will need to pay £600 for a five-year licence.

The borough already runs an additional licencing scheme for HMOs as the council says depending on existing enforcement powers and tools doesn’t provide any incentive to landlords to improve their property.

The consultation closes on 8th August and the results will be published in September.

Read more about London licensing.

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