New legislation has been introduced to give Welsh tenants more security and to help avoid disputes with landlords.

The Renting Homes (Amendment) (Wales) Bill means that from Spring 2022, more simplified and standardised rental contracts will be available for a minimum of 12 months, with model contracts available.

Minimum notice periods will also be extended from two to six months in the case of no-fault evictions, with landlords only able to serve notice six months after tenants have moved in.

Although the notice period is going to be longer, Welsh landlords will still be able to repossess their property if a tenant is in breach of contract.

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julie james ms wales

Housing and local government minister Julie James (pictured) says the law will directly affect the one in three people who currently rent in the region, making it fair, simple and efficient. 

Says James: “Thanks to our efforts, tenants will have greater peace of mind when renting. Everyone has the right to feel secure in their own home and to be able to plan for the future.”

She adds that there will also be clear benefits for landlords. “Clearer and easier to understand contracts will reduce disputes and legal costs and the new regime will provide a better way for landlords to deal with abandoned properties.”

David Wilton, chief executive of tenant advisory service TPAS Cymru, agrees that the new contracts should make it clearer for tenants and landlords to understand their respective rights and responsibilities.

He adds: “We particularly welcome the new protection measures which provide greater security regarding improved notice periods and offer flexibility should tenants’ circumstances change.”

Hammer blow

Angela Davey, President, ARLA Propertymark, says: “The Welsh Parliament’s approval of the Renting Homes (Amendment) (Wales) Bill will introduce significant changes to the way the private rented sector operates in Wales.

“Collectively, having one standardised legal framework is going to enable everyone to operate in exactly the same way, giving clarity on rights and responsibilities through standard written contracts.

“While in some cases these changes will provide more financial security for landlords, it also means it will take landlords 12 months to reclaim their property in the case of “no fault evictions”, which is a hammer blow to the sector.

“We call on the Welsh Government to now stick to its commitment for at least a six-month lead time, or longer, in light of COVID to allow agents and their landlords in Wales to prepare for the upcoming changes.”

7 COMMENTS

  1. “Although the notice period is going to be longer, Welsh landlords will still be able to repossess their property if a tenant is in breach of contract.”
    So if the tenant is a day late in paying the rent, can the landlord repossess? And quickly?

    “Housing and local government minister Julie James (pictured) says the law will directly affect the one in three people who currently rent in the region, making it fair, simple and efficient. ”

    But what’s in it for the landlord?

    “Says James: “Thanks to our efforts, tenants will have greater peace of mind when renting. Everyone has the right to feel secure in their own home and to be able to plan for the future.”

    This doesn’t give landlords peace of mind. Landlords have the right to to peace of mind when letting and have the right to feel secure in the knowledge that rent will be paid in full and on time, and to be able to plan for their own future. With tenants’ rights come tenants’ responsibilities. That issue needs to be addressed.

    David Wilton, chief executive of tenant advisory service TPAS Cymru, agrees that the new contracts should make it clearer for tenants and landlords to understand their respective rights and responsibilities.

    He adds: “We particularly welcome the new protection measures which provide greater security regarding improved notice periods and offer flexibility should tenants’ circumstances change.””

    I clicked on the link in the article, but honestly, I found it difficult to make any sense of it. It’s really not clear to me HELP!

  2. I don’t have a problem with a longer notice period for S21 – after all it can be pretty difficult to uproot your entire life and find somewhere else suitable in 8 weeks. It is good to at least have the ability to evict back on the table. But 6 months will still allow some tenants to rack up huge arrears. How about a notice period related to the length of term of your tenancy so that someone who has been in their home for many years gets the 6 months but those who have only been in 6 or 12 months gets the standard 2 months? That would at least be fairer to both sides.

  3. It may be acceptable for a landlord to take on a low risk tenant under such a system, but no sensible landlord is going to go near a medium to high risk tenant. What will happen to those houses owners decide not to rent out because of the heightened risk, or can’t rent out to low risk tenants, which are hard to sell to to people wanting to live there? I suspect the Council will introduce a scheme where they either rent or buy them at a cheap price to use to house people who are higher risk renters, many of whom will be feral scum. Is this the cunning plan?

  4. “Clearer and easier to understand contracts will reduce disputes and legal costs…..”
    Tenancy contracts are already easy to understand. They lay out the obligations of both parties in simple English, if tenants care to read the tenancy contract that is. I’m sure some of my tenants signed the contract without reading it, or are they just tossing it aside and doing what they like!

  5. Left my house in Glasgow empty for five months rather than accept even moderate or high risk tenants. Unfortunately the low risk tenants usually have means to purchase property with last tenant staying a year. Would leave it empty again than have undesirables

  6. We all know that S21 is mostly used to get rid of rent defaulting tenants.

    Why won’t the Welsh idiots allow eviction after two months of rent default which is 1 month and one day; with NO Court action required.

    If there is no rent defaulting occurring very few LL would bother with S21 which is going anyway.

    So these Welsh changes will soon be gone as well.

    You can pretty much guarantee that when the revised S8 process starts LL are going to experience a whole new world of hurt.

    It will take years to get rid of feckless rent defaulting tenants.

    Leveraged LL are the most vulnerable LL here.
    How will they pay mortgages without rent!?

    Few LL could afford to pay a BTL mortgage if rent stops being paid.

    It simply makes the BTL business proposition not worth the risks anymore so one sided in favour of the tenant has the PRS become.

    The logical response to these problems would be for a leveraged LL to deleverage or sell up

  7. I am proud to be Welsh and a fluent Welsh speaker, but this is absolutely the stuff that Landlords will be committing suicide over. Who on earth is this incredibly irresponsible woman Julie James? As Landlords we are bombarded with rules, some good and sensible, others downright unspeakable! This woman is trying to justify her existence and her large salary, and the idiots voting this legislation through are equally bad. Tell me, how do politicians who do not have a single qualification in the so called field of expertise have the right to ruin our lives by their stupidity?
    I would appreciate if any landlords who feel as strongly as I do about this contact me, and we should fight this collectively. They take no notice of single complaints. I have tried it, and I get some stupid gobledegook from underlings working in the Senedd. This means that you cannot even complain effectively on your own. Where are the NRLA? safely tucked in bed with the Welsh government!
    A lot of Landlords like ourselves rely on this income to pay our way. We cannot afford to have tenants living in our property rent free creating havoc. For some like ourselves it is the income we need to pay our bills. dafyddwelshman@wanadoo.fr

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