Dogs cost their owners £164 in household repairs each year, according to new research – lending weight to the argument for not allowing renters to keep pets.

MoneySuperMarket found that Weimaraners cause the most damage, chewing up an average of £265 in repairs each year while Labradors are the most furniture-friendly, costing £138 a year.

Carpets topped the list of the most dog-gnawed household items (20%), followed by sofas and rugs (17%), chairs (14%) and wooden floors (12%).

Dog owners in London spend the most on repairing the damage caused by their furry friends – £237 – compared with dogs in Wales who cost their owners an average of £108.

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Despite almost a fifth of Brits adding a dog to the family in lockdown, the price comparison website says more than one-third of dog owners don’t have pet insurance to cover the £1.7 billion in household damage they cause each year.

Pet tenants

There’s currently a push from a number of quarters to relax tenancy rules for pet owners.

Apart from the government removing restrictions on well-behaved pets from the model tenancy agreement, Andrew Rosindell’s private members bill – Dogs and Domestic Animals (Accommodation and Protection) Bill – gets its second reading this month and aims to banish the no-pet clause for rented homes.

Says Kate Devine, insurance expert at MoneySuperMarket: “A challenge faced by both first-time and experienced dog owners is the destruction of furniture and other household items.

“While you can try and minimise the risks, it isn’t always possible to eliminate all damage. No matter their age, we recommend that you check your home insurance policy to ensure you are covered for any accidental damage caused by your pets. Without adequate cover, you may find yourself paying hundreds of pounds for repairs.” 

Read more: Allowing for accidental damage.

1 COMMENT

  1. “While you can try and minimise the risks, it isn’t always possible to eliminate all damage. No matter their age, we recommend that you check your home insurance policy to ensure you are covered for any accidental damage caused by your pets. Without adequate cover, you may find yourself paying hundreds of pounds for repairs.”

    Do tenants have any insurance? I’m fairly certain most of mine don’t.

    Can a landlord force a tenant to get insurance and what do they do if the they refuse?

    I wonder if Kate Divine has ever tried to recoup thousands of pounds off an unemployed tenant who’s pets have ruined the laminate and carpets throughout a house, chewed the windowsills and scratched the doors beyond repair, and the garden is covered in dog poo?

    If I’m forced to accept pets – guess what? Rent will go up.

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