Please Note: This Article is 5 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

Moore Blatch, a leading law firm in the South of England, has produced a free, easily downloadable Right to Rent checklist on its website.

The checklist is designed to help those landlords having to conduct ‘right to rent’ immigration checks.

New legislation means that, as of 1 December 2014, landlords in Birmingham, Walsall, Sandwell, Dudley, and Wolverhampton will have to carry out ‘right to rent’ checks for new tenancy agreements to determine whether their tenants have the right to live in the UK legally. If they do not and the landlords have not made the appropriate checks, they could face fines of up to £3,000.

The new measures in the Immigration Act will be carried out initially across the West Midlands before being rolled out across the rest of the UK.

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In most cases, the checks will take a matter of minutes and the landlords will simply need to check the tenant’s passport or Biometric Residence Permit. However, in more complicated cases, landlords may have to contact the Home Office for advice.

Moore Blatch has uploaded the online checklist specifically to help make it easier for landlords to conduct the checks.

Simon Kenny, Senior Solicitor and Head of Immigration at Moore Blatch, said: “It is becoming increasingly difficult for landlords to keep up with the constant changes in legislation.

By putting a free, easily downloadable checklist up on our website, we aim to help them navigate the more complex rules relating to ‘right to rent’. If a landlord has any outstanding issues or queries, we would always recommend that he / she seeks legal advice.”

Moore Blatch has offices in the City of London, Richmond, Southampton, Lymington, and Whiteley.

Download the Checklist here

Please Note: This Article is 5 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

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