Government ministers hoping for the landlord vote at the next election in 2024 may be disappointed, new research among some 14,000 people suggests.

The major new survey has found that 90% of landlords and letting agents believe the government is not supporting the private rental sector, and that a quarter believe Ministers are anti-landlord and pro-tenant.

Also, a fifth are concerned by the increase in regulations, legislation and tax in recent years and months.

These results are from the latest joint MyDeposit/Ome industry polling, which also highlighted legislation, rent reliability and the impact of Covid as key concerns for those operating within the private rental market.

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Professional approach

The research also throws up some interesting insights into this sector, revealing that 40% of landlords rent to professionals, 28% to families, 9% to those on Universal Credit, 7% to students while 6% are ‘others’.

Two other key are revealed by the research – that the UK is now a majority apartment rental market with 47% of all properties in this category, and that 67% of those polled said they had long-term plans to buy their own home.

“In spite of challenges faced including legislation, rent arrears, and evicting tenants, it is evident that the majority of landlords want to remain in the sector because it provides a good source of income and an investment for retirement, making it a worthwhile endeavour,” says Suzy Hershman, Head of Dispute Resolution at mydeposits.

Matthew Hooker, Co-founder of Ome, says: “The results of the survey have highlighted the strengths of market and reinforces that the vast majority of tenant-landlord relationships remain positive.

Read the research in full.

8 COMMENTS

  1. ““In spite of challenges faced including legislation, rent arrears, and evicting tenants, it is evident that the majority of landlords want to remain in the sector because it provides a good source of income and an investment for retirement, making it a worthwhile endeavour,” says Suzy Hershman, Head of Dispute Resolution at mydeposits.”

    Really? Most of the landlords I know are selling up as properties become empty and are not expanding their portfolios. I only know one landlord who is increasing their portfolio.

    I wouldn’t say being a landlord provides a good source of income especially if properties have to all have an EPC of C or above. It’s bad enough having to get the elec certs. Each property is costing me around £500 so that’s about £2 per week that I either have to lose as income or put the rents up. Last year and this year I’ve spent money on new upvc doors and loft insulation. It seems any profit is going into upgrades, taxes, and repairs. Of course I want the properties to be elec safe, but the cost will have to passed on to tenants.

  2. And yet again the chancellor has completely ignored the PRS.

    This NRLA playing the proverbial white man and whispering in his ear clearly is not working – may be time for the hair-dryer treatment..

  3. 100% the govt has totally ignored landlords in the PRS.

    There is zero “Covid” help for anyone without a mortgage and the ever-lasting eviction ban is a total joke.

    I take a close interest in forthcoming legislation and as a result over the last 3 years I’ve divested any properties older than the 1980’s pretty much all of the portfolio is now EPC C with a couple of D’s

    It’s cheaper & easier to sell and reinvest that refurbish to meet EPC current and future targets.

    With that in mind I have just agreed a price on a current property for sale and where I would normally look to re-invest I will definitely do NOTHING until the eviction ban is fully ended. I’d rather just sit on the money that risk having a professional scrounger/non payer in the portfolio.

    The latest wheeze is the possibility that every tenant will be allowed pets. There is no doubt that pets = damage otherwise there would be no market for pet insurance in that respect. The fact that insurance exists is evidence that pets = damage.

    It is impossible to verify if a tenant has cancelled a pet policy therefore its unworkable.

    HMRC say I’m not in trade and that I’m an investor so if a decent investment vehicle comes along I will take it for a ride and maybe leave the PRS behind altogether.

    All investments carry a risk to reward ratio and currently the balance in the PRS has tipped heavily into the high risk category.

    • Your sentiments and actions to date are a very sensible response to the ridiculous Govt policies.
      I’m sure your sentiments and reactions will be shared by many LL.

      Time for LL to offload all their dud properties to Generation Buy.

      These 95% mortgages could enable the Great Escape for LL.
      Sell to all the mug GB.
      They won’t have to bother with EPC’s but they will be severely restricted into who they can sell to when they want to move on.

      No LL will be interested!
      Unless they substantially reduce the price to allow for EPC C status.

      But then who wants to have IWI or EWI on their property!?

      OO are required to comply with EPC regulations.

      EPC regulations will cause a mass sell off.

      Good for GB not so good for all the homeless tenants……………….none of whom will be existing tenants.

  4. Perhaps all LLs should add 20%/30% to rent when next marketing property. This would send a massive signal to the market, agents and hopefully the Government especially when homeless numbers go exponential! Yes it may take a little longer to get new tenant in but I see it as the only way to get message to Government to roll back some of the kicking of the PRS LL in recent legislation.

    • That’s an idea – but I wouldn’t take the risk of renting to anyone until the evictions ban is gone. Even if you double the rent, rogue tenants can just move in and not pay for 6-8 months.

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