Please Note: This Article is 4 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

A South Gloucestershire landlord who fitted an unsafe log burner in his rental property has been prosecuted by the Council.

David Jempson installed the log burner into a rental property he owned in Cromhall. But the wood burning stove caused the tenants to become “concerned for their safety” and they reported it to the Council’s environmental health department.

On inspection it was found that the fire had been incorrectly installed and that it breached six building regulations, plus the failure to provide a carbon dioxide detector, now a requirement under the housing laws. There was insufficient air supply to the appliance and the flue connection was unsafe.

A spokesperson for South Gloucestershire Council said due to the seriousness of the situation it had “no alternative but to prosecute” the 55-year-old Jempson of Fox Court in Longwell Green.

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Jempson pleaded guilty to breaching building and housing regulations at North Avon Magistrates’ Court and he was fined £600 and ordered to pay £500 in costs.

Councillor Colin Hunt told the Bristol Post:

“Many people are installing wood burners and may not realise that they need building regulations approval.

“It’s important to contact your local authority to check if your installation requires building regulation permission.

“This investigation involved the collaboration of South Gloucestershire Council’s housing and building control teams and demonstrates our commitment to protect the safety of residents in their homes.”

South Gloucestershire Council say that residents who see or are affected by illegal building works are encouraged to report it by telephoning 01454 868004 or emailing building.control@southglos.gov.uk.

In England and Wales, from the 1st October 2015 regulations require smoke alarms to be installed in rented residential accommodation and carbon monoxide alarms in all rooms with a solid fuel appliance. The Regulations apply both to houses and flats and failure to comply can lead to a civil penalty of up to £5,000.

Please Note: This Article is 4 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.
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