Please Note: This Article is 6 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

In a letter to members the National Landlords Association (NLA) writes about its success concerning selective licensing schemes and changes to legislation they have helped bring about resulting from NLA lobbying.

“This is why we have spent five years researching, analysing and evaluating policy to force change centrally, and have now succeeded in lobbying the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government to restrict the ability of town halls in England to license private landlords without the express approval of Central Government.”

Since 2010, when the last Government gave local authorities carte blanche over licensing decisions, landlords have been marginalised, says the NLA.

“Blanket licensing schemes have been proposed at an alarming rate and a number have become a reality against the local community’s wishes.

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“The NLA has long struggled to argue against these ‘selective’ licensing schemes locally, with mixed results. We have managed to turn the tide in areas such as Manchester, Bournemouth and Milton Keynes. However, other towns and cities have been less receptive.

“This is why we have spent five years researching, analysing and evaluating policy to force change centrally, and have now succeeded in lobbying the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government to restrict the ability of town halls in England to license private landlords without the express approval of Central Government.”

The result is that in addition to a local authority’s existing duty to consult landlords, town halls will now be required to obtain specific approval from the Secretary of State if more than 1 in 5 landlords, or 20 per cent of the local area will be effected by a proposed scheme.

This, the NLA claim, is a direct result of their work, and will stop schemes like those implemented in the London Borough of Newham and the proposed city-wide one in Liverpool.

More Information here

Please Note: This Article is 6 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.
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