Please Note: This Article is 4 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

Most of us will be aware that EU energy efficiency regulators have outlawed traditional light bulbs and high powered vacuum cleaners.

Next come rules affecting those landlords who let HMOs, multi-let buildings, and supply heating on a communal basis.

Where a central heat source (a boiler for example) supplies heating to several users, landlords will now be under an obligation to make several changes.

The usual system of dividing the cost of supplying heating, hot water and (where applicable) air conditioning by the number of tenants and charging them a share through a service charge will become a criminal offence following the introduction of the Heat Network (Metering and Billing) Regulations 2014.

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Landlords of such buildings, whether commercial or residential, must register with the National Measurement Office originally planned for not later than 30 April, 2015, and must install individual meters, or cost allocators in EU speak, in each unit by 31 December, 2016.  Failure to do so can result in criminal as well as civil penalties.

In an amendment to the regulations the date for registration has now, thankfully, been put back to 31 December 2015.

This measure will affect all landlords with any kind of multi-let building where the cost of heat, hot water and air conditioning is not separately metered.

First of all, they must register with the National Measurement and Regulation Office (NMRO) and, secondly, they must survey their properties to assess the cost and feasibility of installing individual meters.

There is an exemption where it is not cost effective or technically practical to install meters, but the case has to be made for this.  If their record on domestic appliances is anything to go by, the regulators will be pretty hard to persuade.

See – Heat Network (Metering and Billing) Regulations 2014 here

More information here: https://www.gov.uk/heat-networks

Please Note: This Article is 4 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

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