Please Note: This Article is 5 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

Landlord Constantinos Regas is disputing the right of a council to impose compulsory licensing on all buy to let and houses in multiple occupation (HMO) homes in a London borough.

Regas, a house in multiple occupation (HMO) landlord with one investment property in Enfield, North London, is forcing Enfield Council to justify introducing additional and selective licensing for private rented homes across the borough from April 1, 2015.

The case is listed for judicial review before the High Court in London this week to determine if the case should go before another court for a full hearing.

Enfield Council claims unlicensed properties are often poorly managed and generate

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The council wants all landlords to register for a licence which will cost £500 for five years.

According to Office of National Statistics figures, Enfield has around 27,000 private rented homes equating to 20% of all homes in the borough, which means the licensing scheme could raise as much as £13.5 million every five years.

Mr Regas said: “I have always said that good quality housing is a human right. Antisocial behaviour by tenants is often linked to problems like rent arrears, so landlords already have every incentive to deal with issues when they arise.

“Enfield Council has failed to demonstrate that housing in the borough is badly managed, or that there is a clear link between antisocial behaviour and the private rented sector. I am appalled that the council can label tenants in this way.”

The challenge is based on whether the local authorities can show that an area has low housing demand or if they can prove a link between antisocial behaviour and the private rented sector.”

Enfield Council has declined to comment on the case before appearing before the court.

Other London councils are reportedly considering blanket licensing schemes for landlords following the lead of the first scheme in Newham, East London.

Please Note: This Article is 5 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

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