Please Note: This Article is 6 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

A landlord is set to lose his HMO licence for allowing tenants to live in a dirty, dangerous and overcrowded shared house.

Amarjit Singh Gulshan was ordered to pay more than £10,200 in fines and costs at Ealing Magistrates Court after admitting 11 breaches of housing laws.

The court heard that Ealing Council housing officers visited the house and uncovered a ‘filthy and unsafe’ state of repair in the HMO which had six tenants.

They told the magistrates that they saw evidence of mouse and cockroach infestations, inadequate fire safety measures and general filthy conditions.

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Gulshan was ordered to make repairs and clean the house, but when the housing officers went back to check his work, they found little had been done and two more tenants were renting rooms, which made the property overcrowded.

After the case, Councillor Hitesh Tailor, cabinet member for housing, skills and employment said: “Our new private sector strategy has signalled our intent to get tough on rogue landlords and improve conditions for residents. We are ready to go after criminal landlords. ”

Meanwhile, Warwick Council has pout four landlords before the courts for breaking HMO licensing rules.

  • Monika Baty pleaded guilty to letting an overcrowded HMO and was fined £2,500 plus costs. Baty’s licence allowed for up to six tenants but officers found 10 living in the HMO. Baty had ignored previous warnings
  • Delwar King admitted failing to licence an HMO and other offences relating to repairs and management. He was fined £5,000 plus costs
  • Hardip Singh Hothi pleaded guilty to failing to licence an HMO and was fined £3,500 plus costs after firefighters were called to a blaze at the property and realised he was running an HMO without a licence
  • Lakbir Atwal admitted failing to licence an HMO and was fined £2, 500 plus costs.

All appeared before Nuneaton Magistrates.

Councillor Norman Vincett, said: “The vast majority of landlords work well with the council and provide good quality accommodation. However we will not hesitate to enforce the law where tenant’s health and safety is at risk and landlords blatantly disregard the law. “

Please Note: This Article is 6 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.
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