Please Note: This Article is 6 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

Three house in multiple occupation (HMO) landlords have faced separate legal action over the way they mismanaged their properties.

In Bury, Lancashire, Zohar Khan, 45, admitted five safety and licensing offences that made a HMO a potential death trap for tenants.

Magistrates heard fire alarms were turned off, the property lacked fire doors and escape routes were blocked.

Khan was ordered to pay £17,000 in fines and £2,360 costs.

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Magistrate Lynn Smith said: “There was a significant risk to everyone living in the property.

“You are a landlord with 20 properties and your negligence could have caused the death of or injury to your tenants.”

Housing benefits reclaimed

Another HMO landlord in Chester must pay back £5,250 in rents paid as housing benefits collected from three tenants who lived in unlicensed bedsits in the property.

Jonathan Shingfield was fined almost £10,000 by Chester magistrates in October 2013 for HMO safety and licensing offences.

Cheshire West and Chester Council took action to reclaim the benefits at a residential property tribunal.

Alison Amesbury, the council’s head of housing strategy, said: “This is the first time that the council has taken formal action for these types of offences.

The offences came to light when Shingfield tried to illegally evict a tenant by removing his flat door and glass in a window in a bid to force him to leave.

£40,000 fines after fire

A Leicester HMO landlord must pay nearly £40,000 in fines and costs for licensing and management offences at three letting properties in the city.

Harishbhai Patel, 56, admitted 12 offences before Leicester magistrates.

The problems came to light after a fire at one of the houses. All the homes were unlicensed and failed to meet fire safety standards.

Leicester assistant city mayor for neighbourhood services Sarah Russell said: “Proper licensing for HMOs is there to ensure the safety of residents, and landlords who fail to do so are putting tenants at risk.

Please Note: This Article is 6 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.
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