Please Note: This Article is 5 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.

With the impending changes to the law regarding smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarm provision in rented property, many landlords are now weighing up their options when it comes to choosing the best solution to protect their properties and tenants.

The changes scheduled to come into place in October 2015 mean that if you have not yet installed smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in your rental properties, you must do so. You must also ensure that there is at least one smoke alarm per floor, as well as CO alarms present in any rooms containing a fuel burning appliance both of which are new requirements.

Even for those who already have alarms in place, can you be confident they are protecting your property and tenants as well as they should? With the renewed focus on fire safety brought about by this impending change to legislation, now is the time to review the alarms you have in place and make sure you and your properties are protected.

As you may know, if you manage a property built prior to 1992 then the option of battery powered alarms is open. However, if the property was built after this date, you are obliged to install a mains powered type alarm if providing one for your tenants. In either case, you must also ensure that alarms are in good working order when the tenancy begins.

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If you need to purchase new alarms, fire safety specialists Safelincs offer longlife smoke alarms, longlife CO alarms as well as mains powered smoke and CO alarms.

Battery powered longlife alarms ensure that you do not have to worry about the batteries running out leaving the tenants and your property unprotected. Should your rental property be large or have several floors, it is also important to raise the alarm throughout the entire property to avoid the alarm not being heard in bedrooms or other remote rooms. This can be achieved with radio-interlinked smoke alarms. These ensure that the alarm is heard throughout the entire building, which saves valuable seconds, ensuring a quicker escape for your tenants and a faster response by the fire service.

Safelincs offers a vast amount of fire safety information on its website. There is also a specific fire safety section aimed at landlords. In addition landlords can discuss fire safety problems with experts on Safelincs’ fire safety forum.

To purchase smoke and CO alarms, please contact Safelincs on 0800 612 7938 or email support@safelincs.co.uk

Please Note: This Article is 5 years old. This increases the likelihood that some or all of it's content is now outdated.
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7 COMMENTS

  1. The new regulations on CO alarms appear to cover only rooms containing *solid-fuel* burning combustion appliances, e.g. wood and coal. Is this right? I thought faulty gas appliances could produce CO as well.

  2. Yes, I read it as solid fuel burning appliances only – I wish these reports could get simple details correct !

    I suspect the difference between solid-fuel and gas is that every gas installation is required to have an annual safety inspection. That means, for every non-room-sealed appliance, the building will have been assessed to check that there is sufficient ventilation. Of course, that doesn\’t prevent changes being made (eg tenant blocking up vents to reduce draughts and heating costs), but it should catch \”design\” errors such as having a room flued gas fire in a room with no ventilation at all.

  3. I have heard that this legislation has been thrown out by the House of Lords and is therefore not going to become law in October after all. Is this correct?

  4. \”The changes scheduled to come into place in October 2015 mean that if you have not yet installed smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in your rental properties, you must do so.\”
    The above is quite MISLEADING !
    Please read this booklet for correct information on smoke alarms and
    CO alarms which are only required in any room containing a SOLID FUEL BURNING APPLIANCE solid fuel burning appliance (e.g. a coal fire, wood burning stove).

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