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Apr, 2017

Thursday

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  1. #1

    Default tenant - room needs repainted

    We're about to move out of the property we are currently renting, and unfortunately my 2 year old did some damage to the office walls. It's wallpapered and then painted, and none of the damage goes past the wallpaper. The paint job is at least 20 years old, impossible to say how old the underlying wallpaper is. It's an obvious diy that was not done very well. What can the landlord legally charge us for? I know it can be rectified with some polyfilla and a can of paint. Does the standard calculate the cost of the job, divide by useful life left, and then that's what we owe apply to walls? The landlord can't try to claim the cost of hiring a pro to paint when it was a diy job to begin with can they? I am aware they will be able to charge for their own time, so long as it's reasonable, I don't expect anyone to work for free.

    If it is done by the useful life, how long does pain/wallpapert typically last? I'm from the US so I only know how long things in the US are considered to last (and I'm especially unfamiliar with wallpaper).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Don't think useful life has much relevance to the paper, but might to the painting to some extent. It's not like a carpet.

    Some world class establishments have paintwork dating back 150 years. Painting is also timed sensibly to fit with other events (like carpet replacement) not dictated due to damage.

    Painted lining paper - might last for decades with intermittent touch ups. Several of my properties still have the original lining paper dating back to their 1960s construction.

    If the paper itself has been damaged it may require re-papering which would not otherwise have been required at all for a very very long time. So at the very least you should pay for re-papering of the damaged parts (100% of) and a share of the painting. You can't repair damaged paper with polyfilla.

    You are paying how much it would cost to restore it to the way it was.
    The landlord might not have chosen to paint it at all (they might like the 80's color scheme), and you are forcing them to do that. Bear in mind that you will have also imposed other costs (like the loss of rent involved in having to fix it). Painting and filling up costs a lot. It might take a day or two of work to redecorate a room to DIY standard so it is more than a £10 pot of paint and £5 of paper. And there is no reason the landlord should DIY it either.

  3. #3

    Default

    If they chose to hire a pro, surely they couldn't charge us the entire amount for that, since it will be done to a higher standard. Wouldn't that be considered betterment? The diy job was a poor one, the paper is peeling in several areas, and the paint was dingy when we moved in. I thought the requirement was to pay for what it would have been like at the beginning of the tenancy minus wear and tear. Realistically, most homes do not have paint jobs that last 150 years. The 80s color may be fine to the previous owners (house was bought by landlord and let while getting planning permission for teardown and build 2 new), but most people would agree repainting needs to be done from time to time (not every 20 years). Also, the chances of them getting anyone to pay what we did with such dated decor is unrealistic in this area. We saw houses far cheaper and in MUCH better condition when we were looking for a new place to rent now. We were in a very uncommon situation which led us to rent this house, I can say with certainty that even though they are not putting it back up for rent, if they did they would have to lower the price quite a bit or update the decor.

    I'm not trying to get out of this and pay nothing, but I also don't want to pay more than is fair. The house wasn't painted to a professional standard, so I shouldn't have to pay for the landlord to achieve that, even if he doesn't want to do the work himself.



    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewDod View Post
    Don't think useful life has much relevance to the paper, but might to the painting to some extent. It's not like a carpet.

    Some world class establishments have paintwork dating back 150 years. Painting is also timed sensibly to fit with other events (like carpet replacement) not dictated due to damage.

    Painted lining paper - might last for decades with intermittent touch ups. Several of my properties still have the original lining paper dating back to their 1960s construction.

    If the paper itself has been damaged it may require re-papering which would not otherwise have been required at all for a very very long time. So at the very least you should pay for re-papering of the damaged parts (100% of) and a share of the painting. You can't repair damaged paper with polyfilla.

    You are paying how much it would cost to restore it to the way it was.
    The landlord might not have chosen to paint it at all (they might like the 80's color scheme), and you are forcing them to do that. Bear in mind that you will have also imposed other costs (like the loss of rent involved in having to fix it). Painting and filling up costs a lot. It might take a day or two of work to redecorate a room to DIY standard so it is more than a £10 pot of paint and £5 of paper. And there is no reason the landlord should DIY it either.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aeonix View Post
    If they chose to hire a pro, surely they couldn't charge us the entire amount for that, since it will be done to a higher standard. Wouldn't that be considered betterment?
    The first couple of sentences (above) are relevant. The rest of the points you raise are not (whether anyone else would choose to rent the place, desirability of 80's decor etc).

    The fact is that you damaged the place (to some extent - we do not know), and you need to pay to correct the damage.

    (*btw my own home looks perfectly fine and has not been painted for 20 years).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    When u mention polyfiller u indicate there is damage to the wall that goes beyond painting and decorating.

    It would be like someone denting your car and then telling you they can make it look OK. Would you accept that?

    The landlord is entitled to have the wall back to its original state. If that means replastering then unfortunately the cost will be yours.

    Had the wall not been damaged and just needed to be painted over then depending on the length of the tenancy the cost would likely lie with the landlord.

    Its difficult to give advice without seeing the extent but your deposit will likely be protected and an adjudicator will decide what is fair. It won't be a case that the landlord simply withholds your deposit. That is what the schemes are there for

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wright76 View Post
    When u mention polyfiller u indicate there is damage to the wall that goes beyond painting and decorating.

    That is what the schemes are there for
    I have to admit I picked up on this point straight away., paint is paint, and if you need to use polyfiller, then it is definitely below the paper.

    poly-filler, sand, and re-paper. 80gbp cash.

    offer the landlord 100 gbp for the trouble and see what happens.

    and don't ask him to take the money from the deposit. the deposit is there for any problems at the check out, not for when you put holes in his walls.

    personally I would have it fixed myself, at my own cost and make sure its so good the landlord could never tell what happened to it.

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