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Jun, 2017

Saturday

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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NW Cumbria (Lake District)
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    531

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    As I said above you don't have to be evicted to qualify for social housing.
    (Being evicted will actually harm your chances).

    Like a lot of things about the welfare system that "everybody knows", it's a myth, it's based on media misinformation, gossip, and pub-wisdom.
    (The current crop of baliff/sherriff crap on TV are often a prime example of media misinformation in this regard).

    People are also confused (intentionally?) by some council welfare departments saying they will not help you until you are thrown out by the bailiffs.
    That's the welfare department policy on helping you, it's nothing to do with your position on the social housing register itself.

    Being 'unintentionally homeless' (not your fault that you became homeless, eg. S21 notice to quit) will only give you a higher priority for social housing if other factors also apply.

    Most unitentional homelessness is 'non-priority' and qualifies as 'medium need'.

    Being evicted, (for reasons other than a S21, eg. rent arrears), will actually give you the lowest priority for social housing.
    (Lower even than if your are currently a private tenant with no arrears or other problems).

    From my council housing website, which has A (high) to E (reduced priority) banding.
    Band E - Reduced Priority

    Households will have a reduced priority when:

    • Rent arrears or other hosuing related debt
    • Breach of tenancy conditions
    • ....(continues with other reasons).
    http://www.cumbriachoice.org.uk/Data/ASPPages/1/32.aspx

    Again like I said above, check your own councils social housing policy you will find it is similar.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    2,582

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    I thinking you're twisting words nukecad.

    When we say evicted we are talking about s21 and not making yourself intentionally homeless after being evicted through s8.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NW Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    531

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    I'm not twisting words at all,

    I am merely pointing out that being evicted does not give you priority on the housing list.
    (Unless other factors also apply).

    Saying that it will, or that you need to be evicted to get social housing is just misinformation.

    Being evicted by means of S21 will merely put you on the list as 'medium need' Non-priority homeless.
    (Unless other factors also apply).

    Read your councils housing priority policy, heres an extract from the Cumbria one I linked to above:
    Band C - Medium Need

    Non-priority homeless
    Homeless prevention option
    Medical need*
    Employment purposes/give or recieve support*
    Assessed as overcrowded by Cumbria Choice policy*
    Under occupation by 1 bedroom -social landlord tenant only*
    Existing social housing tenants suffering financial hardship as a result of housing benefit changes under The Welfare Reform Act*
    Non-social housing tenants suffering financial hardhsip where re-housing through Cumbria Choice will alleviate their situation
    Unsatisfactory housing -where at least one Category 1 hazard has been identified by the Local Authority*
    If there are other factors as well as being homeless then you may get allocated a higher priority banding.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ashby de la Zouch
    Posts
    2

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    As a landlord of multi-lets I often bring in new people to shared houses without getting the new tenants vetted by the current ones. I am the one who decides who I7 want in my houses and I think that is how it should be. HOWEVER a landlord that brings in new tenants that are not perfectly suited to get on well with those already there is asking for trouble. I know many landlords who won't do the checks I do (and I don't mean just asking for loads of references) and they fill rooms with people who just alienate everyone else. And the landlord wonders why they have so many empty rooms! I have perfected a system now that means we just don't get bad tenants and they always get on wiith those already there. My tenants therefore don't mind that I don't ask for their approval because they know I'll always chose the right people. I hope you manage to sort your situation out soon and find somewhere with a landlord you can trust.
    Steve

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NW Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    531

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    I have perfected a system now that means we just don't get bad tenants.....
    Do you feel like sharing it? I'm sure other LL's would be interested.

    I hope you manage to sort your situation out soon and find somewhere with a landlord you can trust.
    I don't mistrust my landlord, we get on very well with usually with some give and take on both our parts, he just seems to have a blind spot with this particular situation. (or maybe it's my blind spot?)
    I have been thinking for a while about if this property is going to be suitable for me in the longer term, but never got round to looking for somewhere else because I've been fairly OK here. (Inertia is built into most humans).
    It has just given me a nudge in what I think will be the right direction for me in the future, and so I have started looking elsewhere - in particular with regard to social housing which I'm going to need sooner or later if I don't peg out first from the health conditions.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    2,582

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    Nukecad, I think it is your blind spot.

    In 'Room by room' rental HMO's inevitably the landlord vets the tenants. I think you have been blindsided by the fact you all knew each other when you moved in and the rather informal nature of how things have been.

    If you want to vet the new tenant, request a joint and several tenancy for the whole place and the inherent danger 'joint and several' brings. (including the cost of the room void which the landlord has so far sucked up).

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NW Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    531

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    Update to this,

    I received an email at 4:30 yesterday "Are you still interested in the property at ****** that you expressed an interest in last month? If so please contact me on *****".

    She is not in the office today, but it looks like I am being offered a flat not far from where I am now. Easy walking distance.
    Decent flats in a nice quiet cul-de-sac.

    After only one month on the housing list with no priority, and no I haven't been evicted.

    I'll let you all know how it goes.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NW Cumbria (Lake District)
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    531

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    Well, today I have been offered that flat I mentioned last week.

    Its a one bedroom, ground floor flat, in a quiet cul-de-sac not far from where I live now.

    It's actually the first property I put a 'bid' on, the first day I was registered on the housing list.

    There's a couple of checks they need to do - proof of ID, proof of income, talk to my current landlord, etc.
    But that's no problem, they do things pretty quickly once they get moving.
    I'm told that I should get the keys on Thursday to give it a viewing, and keep them if I'm going to accept the offer.
    (TBH I'd be mad not to accept, unless there is something seriously wrong with the structure. I even already know most of the neighbours).

    I'll probably take a walk round later today to take a look at it from the outside.

    I'm pretty surprised myself to say the least.

    Just over a month on the social housing register, band D+ ('low need'); and I get an offer of a ground floor flat.

    I expected it to take a lot longer than that.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NW Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    531

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    And another update:

    The offer of the flat has been withdrawn.

    They were ready to give me the keys, all checks had been fine.
    And then my LL said to them that I have the equivalent of 20 weeks rent arrears - from 2011.

    It's the first I'd heard of it and it's bloody ridiculous, 20 weeks rent arrears from 6 years ago and not evicted but still here?

    I've now found out what he is refering to and it does not show any rent arrears at all.

    It's an draft, unfinished, spreadsheet that I started doing for him as a favour in 2011 showing rent paid for all 3 tenants in this HMO.
    It was never finished.

    It shows expected total rent against tenant receipts held for a 38 week period.
    Because of the ways rents were collected one receipt total would often cover all 3 seperate rents.
    One of us would collect all three together and take it to a local takeaway run by his relative.
    (Yes I know but we were clueless about rental legislation at the time, the other guy in the HMO still pays his rent weekly this way).

    There were 7 receipts held by the other tenants that were not included in that draft, and so of course the unfinished spreadsheet shows a large shortfall in the total expected rent.
    It's this shortfall in receipted payments from all three tenancies that he is claiming is evidence of my having rent arrears.

    I'm bloody furious.
    I can prove that what he is saying is ridiculous and that there is no evidence of rent arrears at all, just some receipts (from other tenants) not included on an unfinished spreadsheet.
    (And he doesn't have his own receipts or payment records from that time, the ones we got were carbonless copies,that is one of the reasons I was doing the spreadsheet for him).

    But for now they have just taken his word for it.

    It's all going to take time to sort out now, and in the meantime I have lost the offer of that flat and have no chance of applying for.

    I'm not sure at all just why he has done this. (Except maybe he doesn't want to lose my direct paid HB payments).

    If the council get involved and start investigating they will find he has not been complying with legislation.
    To start with:
    Weekly rent, paid in cash, scrappy receipts (even some on post-it notes for gods sake), no rent books issued (LTA 1985, as ammended, Reg.4).

    I don't know what the penalties for not providing a weekly rent book would be.
    But I'm pretty sure if it goes this far then the taxman may also get involved, asking questions about where the rent paid in cash has been declared.
    Not just for this property but for all his rental properties.

    As you can imagine this has not done much for Landlord/Tenant relations.

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