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Jul, 2014

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Thread: Paint Types

  1. #1

    Default Paint Types

    Does anyone have any good guidance about which types of paint can go on top of which, and which should in general be used where in the house, and what their properties are.

    There are now so many types that I've lost track.

    eg I can eggshell over emulsion, but not the other way round (unless I sand in a key first?). What about gloss, silk, and all the rest.

    Is there an expert who could give us a summary?

    ML
    Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    2,107

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    Quote Originally Posted by midlandslandlord View Post
    Does anyone have any good guidance about which types of paint can be used where in the house, and what their properties are.
    I hope the link below helps.

    http://www.diydata.com/materials/paints/paints.php
    These comments assume you are in England/Wales, and that your last tenancy agreement was dated after 6th April 2007.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Halesowen, West Midlands
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    As a general rule, anything oil based is usually good for moisture areas, bathrooms, kitchens, etc, and for sealing against damp coming through. I am a big fan of water based for interior and exterior wood and metal for several good reasons, firstly they dry quickly, the tools are easy to clean in water, and the job can usually be finished in a day. They give off less or no odours/vapours and are low in VOC content. (Volatile organic compounds). Like everything, you get what you pay for, and good names are worth the extra. But that is not the whole story. Painting is a 'proportional' job, the finish is proportional to the effort expended in preparation. The tools are just as important. Cheap brushes are hard and lose bristles and generally have steel ferrules that rust if used with water based paints. Known makes, like Harris, are good quality synthetic bristle with stainless ferrules that don't rust. It's an indepth topic, painters have their own ways about them.
    Ohm sweet Ohm

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Central south coast
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    Due to new EEC regulations (what else!) paint formulas are changing from what we knew.

    Oil based eggshell is now overtaken by acrylic types and aluminium primer - useful for those 'difficult to get paint to stick situations' has been banned.

    Emulsion, vinyl or otherwise is still around and should go under eggshell ML if that is what you were asking?
    I recently bought some Dulux Satin Finish for wood to paint a bookcase and it came out gloss. On complaining to Dulux I was told by a German person that that is the vay it is now due to the EEC.



    Freedom at the point of zero............

  5. #5
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    The reformulation of paints to comply with new lower VOC content rules has been a step forward for the environment and for decorators' health (some VOCs in paints are carcinogenic), but has resulted in significant technical problems, mainly to do with the fact that oil-based white paint used inside (e.g. gloss, satinwood) now yellows very quickly (within three months in some cases). Not a problem with exterior work as uv light keeps it white.

    The big paint companies are only just starting to address the problem - about two years too late. Dulux in particular have been desperately slow and apart from their acrylic waterbased Diamond Satinwood, I wouldn't touch their paints for wood.

    Water-based trim paints are definitely the way forward. They have all the advantages listed above and if you choose carefully and allow two weeks to cure, they can produce as durable a finish as the old oil-based makes.

    My personal recommendation for white gloss/satinwood is Johnstones Aqua:
    http://www.johnstonestrade.com/produ...=Acrylic_Satin or http://www.decoratingwarehouse.co.uk...FZARfAodB0hP9Q
    It is harder to get a perfect finish as it was with oil-based, but with a good quality synthetic brush (e.g. a Purdy) - not bristle - and a bit of patience, it is possible. You will need at least two coats, possibly three.

    Emulsion paints have been largely unaffected by the changes but the rule holds true that you get what you pay for - except in the case of Farrow and Ball... whose colours are undeniably lovely but the paint itself is very inconsistent in quality. Much better to get their colours made up in Johnstone's/Leyland at half the price!

    And avoid anything prefaced by the word 'Value'. It'll be pants.
    How is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain. Remember when I took that home winemaking course, and I forgot how to drive? Homer Simpson

  6. #6
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    Happened to tune into 'Watchdog' on TV when they were talking to Dulux about their oil based gloss going yellow.

    Apparently now they are over the problem.
    All posts in good faith, but do not rely on them

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bel View Post
    Happened to tune into 'Watchdog' on TV when they were talking to Dulux about their oil based gloss going yellow.

    Apparently now they are over the problem.
    Ask any decorator and s/he will gie you a wry look and beg to differ.
    How is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain. Remember when I took that home winemaking course, and I forgot how to drive? Homer Simpson

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the comments.

    ML
    Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bel View Post
    Happened to tune into 'Watchdog' on TV when they were talking to Dulux about their oil based gloss going yellow.

    Apparently now they are over the problem.
    Gee and I thought it was the tenants smoking that caused this problem lol!

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