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WILLOMAX
23-01-2008, 11:01 AM
New to this game so any help and advice would be appreciated.
Two student houses.
Carpets in one house are one year old and now has two rooms with iron burns in them (one room a bad burn , the other 3 or 4 smaller burns).
The second house the carpets are 2 yrs old and now has two rooms with burns from a sheesh? in them. (golf ball size burns)
There were no faults with the carpets when ast started.
Carpet fitter states that I need to replace the whole carpet as joins would not be acceptable due to colour and ruffing up. (Is that fair on the tenant?)
Do I charge the tenant the whole cost of replacment (£1400.00) or do I deduct an amount as the carpets were not brand new when damaged and I have claimed depreciation over the years.
I want to be fair but not out of pocket because of their stupidity.
Thanks in advance.

jeffrey
23-01-2008, 11:49 AM
A sheesh?
Certainly the burns damage does not sound like fair wear and tear.
Is existing T staying-on or leaving?
(If staying) Tell T re the cost and ask whether he/she is content to leave damaged carpet in place (whilst T acknowledges respopnsibility for damage and that replacement cost will ultimately be deducted from deposit after a reasonable allowance for wear and tear).
(If leaving) Tell T that replacement cost (after such allowance) will be deducted from deposit.

pcwilkins
23-01-2008, 12:28 PM
Carpet fitter states that I need to replace the whole carpet as joins would not be acceptable due to colour and ruffing up.

There's a surprise. Of course, carpet fitter might have an ulterior motive?


Do I charge the tenant the whole cost of replacment (£1400.00)

No. You must take into account the fact that the carpets are now second hand and therefore not worth as much as a new carpet.


or do I deduct an amount as the carpets were not brand new when damaged and I have claimed depreciation over the years.

Yes.


I want to be fair but not out of pocket because of their stupidity.

You are going to be out of pocket if you buy new carpets. Why not go for second hand ones? Look for some offcuts? That might save a few £££. Or just tell the carpet fitter to replace the burnt bits and if he's not willing to because it would offend his eye (or wallet) then find a different carpet fitter who will do what you want, not what he wants.

Peter

WILLOMAX
23-01-2008, 12:31 PM
Thank you for your comments.
In your experience is 10% per year for wear and tear acceptable?
Apparently it is a 'Shisha'

pcwilkins
23-01-2008, 12:37 PM
In your experience is 10% per year for wear and tear acceptable?

If you would normally expect a carpet to last 10 years, then 10% is exactly right. If you expect a carpet to last 50 years, then it would be 2%.

Peter

WILLOMAX
23-01-2008, 12:46 PM
Thank you for your wise words!

jeffrey
23-01-2008, 13:27 PM
Apparently it is a 'Shisha'
So why does Oxford English Dictionary website deny all knowledge of such a word?

Stel
23-01-2008, 13:35 PM
Jeffrey a full explanation........
http://www.shishapipe.net/

jeffrey
23-01-2008, 13:36 PM
Jeffrey a full explanation........
http://www.shishapipe.net/
Aha, the happy hookah...

Ericthelobster
23-01-2008, 18:11 PM
(If staying) Tell T re the cost and ask whether he/she is content to leave damaged carpet in place (whilst T acknowledges respopnsibility for damage and that replacement cost will ultimately be deducted from deposit after a reasonable allowance for wear and tear).And in fact you can point out to T that the longer they stay, the less it will actually cost them... if they stayed in the property for as long as the effective lifetime of the original carpet, it wouldn't cost them anything at all.

billmccallum
23-01-2008, 20:23 PM
If the tenants are staying, why change the carpets??? If they were happy to cause the damage and live with it, why not let them.

As for wear & tear, you have said that you are depreciating, so that will give you the starting point to work out the current value, if you are depreciating at 20% for 5 years then after two years they will be worth 60% of the original cost. e.g £1000 now worth £600

If you decide to buy new carpets which cost more than the original £1000then you cant expect them to pay for the extra cost, that would come later if they caused more damage.

Surrey
23-01-2008, 21:12 PM
And if they're in the habit of damaging carpets, then leave them with the burns - who's to say they won't just damage the new ones?

jeffrey
24-01-2008, 09:55 AM
After all, it's Burns night...

Skengland
24-01-2008, 10:13 AM
ARLA recommends (sp??):

a) Cost of carpet = £500

b) Actual age of existing carpet/item = 2 years

c) Average useful lifespan of carpet/ item = 10 years

d) Residual lifespan of carpet/ item calculated as c) less b)= 8 years

e) Depreciation of value rate calculated as a) divided by c) = £50 a year

f) Reasonable apportionment cost to tenant calculated as d) times e) = £400

Burn baby burn, Disco inferno (sorry couldn't resist, I blame Jeffrey)

jeffrey
24-01-2008, 10:41 AM
ARLA recommends (sp??)

Yes. Think "command", from same root- one c, two m.




Burn baby burn, Disco inferno (sorry couldn't resist, I blame Jeffrey)
Yes.
Crazy World of Arthur Brown: Fire, I'll teach you to burn.
Bangles: Eternal flame.
Lindisfarne: Smoke on the Water.

Stel
24-01-2008, 11:17 AM
Smoke on the water Deep Purple Please!

jeffrey
24-01-2008, 11:22 AM
Smoke on the water Deep Purple Please!
Fog/Smoke on the Tyne/Water; whatever!

jeffrey
24-01-2008, 12:45 PM
...and didn't Little Richard have Great Balls of Fire? Goodness, gracious- it sounds painful.

Surrey
24-01-2008, 21:07 PM
Behave, you lot! :D

BTW, you would only be able to use Skegland's formula where (b) is the time the carpets are renewed, not necessarily when the carpets got burnt. If they burnt the carpets when they (the carpets, silly!) were 2 years old and left the property when the carpets were 3 years old, having lived with burnt carpets for a year, then the example works as follows:

a) Cost of carpet = £500

b1) Actual age of existing carpet/item when the damage was incurred = 2 years

b2) Actual age of existing carpet/item at the end of the tenancy = 2 years

c) Average useful lifespan of carpet/ item = 10 years

d) Residual lifespan of carpet/ item calculated as c) less b2)= 7 years

e) Depreciation of value rate calculated as a) divided by c) = £50 a year

f) Reasonable apportionment cost to tenant calculated as d) times e) = £350

So you can see that the time when the damage occurred is actually irrelevant, it's when you replace the item that counts. And if you change the condition of items on the inventory DURING a tenancy, try to write to the tenants with details of any change. A change may be an improvement like replacing a carpet or damage you caused like scratching a door when installing a lock.