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craigwildy
21-01-2008, 11:07 AM
My previous tenants vacated my flat in December gone but with an arrears of £1040. I held a £520 deposit which means that I am owed the remaining £520 + £110 for cleaning costs (property was left in filthy condition).

The tenants left no forwarding address and the post that has been coming through from them include more than one demand / debt collection letters.

Do you think it is worth my time and effort in trying to track down the tenants and recovering the debt (£630) or should I just write it off as a bad debt and move on?

Thanks
Craig

Surrey
21-01-2008, 15:09 PM
Only you can judge whether you'd have a chance of recovery, or whether you'd be throwing away the court costs in addition.

Did you have any details of where they worked? Were they rehoused by the local council or did they go to a private landlord or do you just not know?

Ericthelobster
21-01-2008, 15:13 PM
Do you think it is worth my time and effort in trying to track down the tenants and recovering the debt (£630) or should I just write it off as a bad debt and move on?Firstly, depends how likely it is they are to be able to pay up if and when you find them. If it's a single mother on benefit, I wouldn't bother; if it's a barrister, well...

Presumably secondly, how hard is it likely to be to trace them - how much info have you got to pass to a tracing agency? I imagine the less you have the more it will cost to locate them.

craigwildy
21-01-2008, 22:08 PM
The tenants are both in work but I do not know their employers. Apart from their names I do not have any more information on them.

Think it is going to be a case of 'live and learn'!

starlettings
21-01-2008, 23:24 PM
The tenants are both in work but I do not know their employers. Apart from their names I do not have any more information on them.

Think it is going to be a case of 'live and learn'!



Well it depends on YOUR cash flow....

I would take great pleasure in suing them at the address they have just left...they wont be able to defend!!! it will cost you around £100 to get judgement!!

Then one day they will try to borrow or get a mortgage...they will be stuck and come to you to pay up and get CCJ satisfied....

+ Costs....and you taking say 8 weeks to let them do it!!....Bugger them up i would!

jeffrey
22-01-2008, 10:17 AM
Unusually, I think, I agree with Starlettings.
CCJs are not an ideal remedy. At least initially, they rarely cajole the debtor (D) into paying forcibly what D could previously have paid without CCJ. On the other hand, they ARE an excellent way of deterring other putative lenders/creditors/landlords- when D finds that no further credit lines are forthcoming, the debt repayment often is!

davidjohnbutton
22-01-2008, 11:01 AM
The trouble is that CCJ's rarely follow the debtor around by which I mean that if the debtor moves, unless a credit giver checks their previous address then they are unlikely to discover CCJ's obtained at that previous address. Most check back 3 years, so if the tenant has been in his currrent property for that length of time and kept clean of money problems, the debts he left behind are never discovered!

Secondly, CCJ's drop off the records after 6 years whether paid or not.

And whereas CCJ's are in theory chaseable for evermore, in practice you have to ask the courts leave to enforce after six years has passed from date of judgment - generally granted up to the 15 year mark.

Esio Trot
22-01-2008, 13:56 PM
The trouble is that CCJ's rarely follow the debtor around by which I mean that if the debtor moves, unless a credit giver checks their previous address then they are unlikely to discover CCJ's obtained at that previous address.

I do feel I need to disagree with you here.

In another business I operate, we regularly do credit checks on potential clients. I can assure you that the likes of Experian and Equifax gather their information from numerous sources, not just the electoral roll and credit applications.

For example, most utility companies now share information, including the Gone Away Information Network (GAIN). You will invariably find that if a tenant leaves owing rent, then they will also owe on utilities (inc Council Tax). Again, most banks now share information, including addresses, to prevent numerous loan applications being processed within a day or two.

We also only ask for 3 years addresses (though this year we have increased this to 5). We say that ALL addresses lived at, even if only a month or two, must be listed. It is amazing that someone will give, say, three addresses for the five years - when the credit check is done, six or more come back as "linked" addresses. These are called undisclosed addresses, and when these occur the application is normally declined (I mean, it may well be that they have only lived at xxx for 4 months because they didn't pay the rent and left before it got to court.).

Unless they were on benefits and had no assets (which is not the case with these, from what you say) I would say go for the CCJ, but not for the net amount. Go for the full amount without taking into account the deposit. Should they ever wish to pay, then you can accept the lower amount (or something in between) and issue them a certificate of satisfaction.