PDA

View Full Version : Fire safety for non-HMOs. What do YOU do?



Bel
25-07-2007, 09:22 AM
HMO regs ( applicable to all tenacies of 3 or more people who are not related)are very clear on what fire precautions need to be taken.

I am interested what landlords/agents are currently providing for non-hmo tenants. My research seems to suggest that providing a fire blanket and extingisher in the kitchen and a smoke detector on each level is satisfactory.

Landlords & Agents, do you do this? If not, why not? Tenants can contribute to this post with their own experiences.

Bludnok
25-07-2007, 09:56 AM
I thought to qualify as an HMO it also had to be on three or more floors no? That is what the Council told me just after the law came in, has it changed? I have 4 tenants in a house on 2 floors with shared amenities (friends) and no locks on the doors and thought that didn't qualify.

Dave

Bel
25-07-2007, 10:47 AM
It is a HMO but does not require a Mandatory licence. All the HMO regs still apply. The council are only likely to hassle you if an incident happens or your tenants complain. Then they could serve you a notice to upgrade to all the fire specifications etc., overcrowding issues, management issues etc

Anyway...what fire precautions do you use?

Bludnok
25-07-2007, 10:58 AM
Then they could serve you a notice to upgrade to all the fire specifications etc., overcrowding issues, management issues etc


Then it would be emptied as quickly as possible and placed straight on the market! The upgrades would cost tens of thousands.

I use smoke alarms on both floors, fire extinguishers on both floors and in kitchen, fire blanket, windows that will open wide enough to permit escape, fire doors on bedrooms and kitchen. I also make every tenant read a safety leaflet I have provided for them, I also insist they have no locks on their doors so they can't get locked in.

It is after all my property and I would like the damage kept to a minimum

Dave

Bel
25-07-2007, 22:49 PM
I also make every tenant read a safety leaflet I have provided for them,



What.......out loud? :)

noopin
25-07-2007, 23:31 PM
Fortunately (not necessarily for me) all my properties are recently rewired, which means sufficient power outlets - a lot of trouble comes from overloading outlets.
Heat (fire) detectors are now mandatory under B.Regs for kitchens, when rewiring I must say I've never put in extinguishers or blankets.
Smoke detectors often seem to be a matter of "..how many do you want...let's put one there and one there, that seems about right" as far as electricians go. In fact, it's very important to get them sited properly (see B.Regs http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/BR_PDF_ADB1_2006.pdf) to be useful. That's "useful" as in lifesaving, of course.

Bludnok
27-07-2007, 06:04 AM
Fireproof ceilings, fireproof flooring, mains operated alarms, potentially basins in every bedroom, the list seems endless. It's on the website

ah84
27-07-2007, 08:50 AM
Not sure they want fireproof flooring and ceilings to be honest. I think they are more interested in the automatic fire detection system which gives early warning of fire to all occupants so that they can get out quickly.

I have a couple of HMO's licenceed from Barnet and they have not asked anything about floors and ceilings.

I do feel some of the rules are ridiculous. For instance a minimum room size of 13 square metres. My small rooms are very popular but now I will have to knock them through into the larger rooms next door and convert into bathroom to make a studio flat. Hence I won't have any cheap rooms to let and yet the government goes on about cheap accomodation.

Additionally the licence fee at 200 per room not per house mounts up. Not really making much profit at the moment and if was not for CGT would have sold up and we have been doing bedsits for 30 years.

The final stupid thing is that they want wash hand basins in toilets. Even though every room has their own sink and the bathroom next to the loo has a sink!

No problem with the fire alarm though but the poster who said 2500, perhaps is talking about a very small house. Will be lucky you get away with 3500 and then need emergency lighting too which will add another few hundred quid.

Bel
27-07-2007, 09:40 AM
Guys....Great discussion, but any ideas on what you consider a minimum in a non-hmo property also appreciated.

ah84
27-07-2007, 14:31 PM
Guys....Great discussion, but any ideas on what you consider a minimum in a non-hmo property also appreciated.

Surely it depends on the house.

Are we talking about people sharing a standard house or self contained units?

Bel
27-07-2007, 14:36 PM
Surely it depends on the house.

Are we talking about people sharing a standard house or self contained units?

Whatever your personal experience is of.....