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Stroller
26-07-2005, 17:36 PM
If you have a TV Licence for a property which may be let in the future, can you be refunded any of the licence fee when the property is let out?

Thank you

MrShed
26-07-2005, 19:14 PM
As far as I am aware, if you pay by direct debit ONLY you can get unused quarters refunded. Otherwise, you can get the license transferred to another property.

Stroller
26-07-2005, 21:41 PM
So what about if you pay all at once, or by monthly direct debit?

MrShed
26-07-2005, 22:07 PM
OK.....not being harsh here, but I've done what you should have done :P and looked at the tv licencing website http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/gethelp/faqs.jsp#link4

You can get a refund for any full quarters unsued, regardless of payment method. Or you can transfer to another person.

WarwickGrad
19-07-2008, 16:28 PM
i have a house with 4 flats

who is responsible for paying the tv license?

they all pay me rent and i pay the things like the council tax and gas/electricity bills

the contract doesnt mentioned the tv license

my tenent informs me that they can and investigated the premises today

any ideas where i stand and what the repercussions could be?

thanks in advance...

Pelican eats pigeon
19-07-2008, 16:34 PM
Did you supply TVs as furnishings in the flats?

P.Pilcher
19-07-2008, 21:33 PM
The offence is to watch an unlicensed telly, not to own one. If you supplied the tellies then, unless you stated in your leases that the tenant was required to license same, it is probable that you should have done. If the tenants themselves acquired the tellies then they should have acquired licenses if they wanted to watch them.

P.P.

Bart
20-07-2008, 12:45 PM
Just found this on http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/information/index.jsp

You need a TV Licence to use any television receiving equipment such as a TV set, digital box, DVD or video recorder, PC, laptop or mobile phone to watch or record television programmes as they're being shown on TV.

If you use a digital box with a hi-fi system or another device that can only be used to produce sounds and can't display TV programmes, and you don't install or use any other TV receiving equipment, you don't need a TV Licence.

Hope this answers your question.

WarwickGrad
20-07-2008, 13:23 PM
thanks guys

so as i havent supplied any of the tvs, then i'm not liable i guess

would i be liable if i knew about tvs being used in my premises?

P.Pilcher
20-07-2008, 15:36 PM
It's unlikely, despite that it is not unknown for T.V. license inspectors to "bend" the law to suit their own aims and objectives. As I said, the only offense is committed by a person watching an unlicensed telly (or using other equipment capable of receiving a television transmission).

P.P.

Pelican eats pigeon
20-07-2008, 19:55 PM
I would do some reading up on here in general - you seem to have been having a few problems with both tenants and agents recently. There are a lot of very helpful articles on the main site as well as in the forum that can help avoid a lot of problems and/or doubt.

Certainly you will want to use an AST that doesn't leave any room for ambiguity as to this issue in future.

Bubbleicious5
21-11-2009, 15:53 PM
Hi

Yet another question. I haven't cancelled my TV licence yet. My property has just been let and is furnished complete with TVs. Am I responsible for TV Licence or the tenant?

Cheers.

B x

Ericthelobster
21-11-2009, 16:09 PM
My property has just been let and is furnished complete with TVs. Am I responsible for TV Licence or the tenant?It's up to you decide you is going to pay for the license - your AST agreement should state this clearly for the avoidance of doubt - but it will be the individual living at the property and watching the TV who is the one who gets prosecuted.

mind the gap
21-11-2009, 16:14 PM
Unless you have undertaken in the TA, as Eric says, to pay for the TV licence, then I would take yours with you to your next address and inform the licensing authorities online that you have done so. Ts usually expect to pay for their own.

Also, if the rooms are let out on separate ASTs they should all (in theory) buy their own licences, i.e. one per each bedroom with TV in it. But that is their problem, not yours.

jmh
07-07-2010, 12:03 PM
I let out a furnished flat and currently I pay the TV licence. However, my current tenant is leaving soon as when I get a new tenant I will no longer pay for the licence.
I just want to check that it is okay to do this, i.e, because I supply the TV does it mean I have to pay the licence?

jta
07-07-2010, 13:43 PM
Then you should remove the television set, let the tenant buy their own and pay for their own license.

mjbfire
07-07-2010, 13:52 PM
I agree with jta, don't put anything electical into a P, unless you have to, as if it breaks you have to replace it.
But if you do , view it the same as if you leave a telephone in a flat, Do you have to pay the telephone bill. NO, unless you have agreed to pay the bill in the contract(TVs sometimes in HMOs with T on individal agreements).

jmh
07-07-2010, 14:12 PM
Thank you for your help, I'll look to remove anything electrical before the next tenant moves in!

jta
07-07-2010, 14:14 PM
I'll look to remove anything electrical before the next tenant moves in!

Well not everything! You can leave him a light bulb.

mind the gap
07-07-2010, 22:35 PM
There is no reason why a LL supplying a TV set in a rental property must also pay for the licence. That is the occupants' responsibility.

jmh
08-07-2010, 08:03 AM
One more question, currently the flat is furnished and although everything is in good condition, it is all eight years old now aqnd I don't really want to replace any furnishings.
Can I put in the new contract that although the flat is furnished, if anything needs replacing it will be down to the tenant?

thesaint
08-07-2010, 10:43 AM
One more question, currently the flat is furnished and although everything is in good condition, it is all eight years old now aqnd I don't really want to replace any furnishings.
Can I put in the new contract that although the flat is furnished, if anything needs replacing it will be down to the tenant?

You basically need to say that the flat is unfurnished, and there are x, y and z items in the property.
If you don't want them, say now and I will dispose of them, anything else is yours to keep.

mjbfire
08-07-2010, 11:01 AM
Also get rid of anything that either not fire regulated, or that you not sure of.

jeffrey
08-07-2010, 11:06 AM
Also get rid of anything that either not fire regulated, or that you not sure of.
Inc. potentially wonky or life-expired portable electrical equipment.

HMO Landlord
10-02-2011, 15:13 PM
Question. ( a small one but very important)

I pay all the bills in an HMO except for TV licence which i am now concerned about as there has been many letters from the licence company addressed to "The Occupiers"

I have put up notices and i have sent text messages to all in the house regarding TV licenses but no one has purchased one as yet.

There is no communal room in the house and i supply no TV.

Should i pass names of tenants onto TV licence company....or should i sell the house and move to the mountains.
Thank you all.

Snorkerz
10-02-2011, 15:38 PM
The TV licenses are the individual tenants problem - and they will need one EACH! Just for belt-and-braces, send a letter to each tenant (with proof of posting) outlining their responsibilities.

TV licensing will catch them soon enough - you have no obligation to report because you have no way of verifying if they do or do not have licenses.

HMO Landlord
10-02-2011, 16:03 PM
Thanks for ultra quick response. Sounds like a sensible option.

A couple of months ago (for new tenants, not the ones mentioned in the thread) I incorporated it into the tenancy agreements and new tenants also sign a separate form stating that they are responsible for TV licence and that the landlord is not. I've sort of become a little OCD on such matters lately.

Do you think text messages to tenants stand as evidence of such things, especially if they reply back, or do you think that is a stupid method.

mind the gap
10-02-2011, 16:16 PM
Thanks for ultra quick response. Sounds like a sensible option.

A couple of months ago (for new tenants, not the ones mentioned in the thread) I incorporated it into the tenancy agreements and new tenants also sign a separate form stating that they are responsible for TV licence and that the landlord is not. I've sort of become a little OCD on such matters lately.

Do you think text messages to tenants stand as evidence of such things, especially if they reply back, or do you think that is a stupid method.

Emails or letters are probably more reliable and perhaps easier to store copies of.

Snorkerz
10-02-2011, 16:31 PM
Do you think text messages to tenants stand as evidence of such things, especially if they reply back, or do you think that is a stupid method.
Not stupid, but difficult to prove and easy to lose. If I wanted to prove I had sent a text from my (admittedly very low tech) phone, I would have to send the phone in with my paperwork!!

HMO Landlord
10-02-2011, 16:48 PM
lol. Snorkerz, I can see it now. Judge with white wig on peering down glasses at a complicated mobile phone. (i know it's not really like that but it's a funny image).

I have an i phone and they are great at tracking messages...it stores all the messages from each person and from oneself as one easy to read conversation. To get one free and many other electrical items just click on.........No not really, I do hate spammy adverts like that. If one could only print messages from iphone though. mmmmm

HMO Landlord
10-02-2011, 16:49 PM
Emails or letters are probably more reliable and perhaps easier to store copies of.


Good idea, i'll request an email address from all future tenants, cheers.

Moderator1
13-02-2011, 22:06 PM
Several largely similar questions on separate threads have been merged into this thread (hence the repetitive nature of answers).