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Wayward21
13-03-2007, 17:51 PM
We are shortly moving out a property that we have been tenant of for a year. When we moved in, the garden in the property was perfectly and professionally cut, weeded and newly turfed.

We let the grass grow a little in the hot summer, it then dried out and now although the grass is cut back and there are no weeds, there are rather large patches of no grass and it doesn't look great.

I'm terrified a good section of my 1,000 pound deposit is going to go on this garden, and I want to know what my best course of action is over the next two weeks. The landlord complained about the garden when the grass was very long, but once we had cut and sorted it, they were still not 'happy' with the state of it, although they couldn't tell us what was wrong!

Should I be returfing the entire garden despite much of the damage to it being due to a very hot summer, or should I just be cutting it as cleanly as possible and perhaps reseeding it and how try to lose the least amount of my deposit over it?

Poppy35
13-03-2007, 18:39 PM
We are shortly moving out a property that we have been tenant of for a year. When we moved in, the garden in the property was perfectly and professionally cut, weeded and newly turfed.

We let the grass grow a little in the hot summer, it then dried out and now although the grass is cut back and there are no weeds, there are rather large patches of no grass and it doesn't look great.

I'm terrified a good section of my 1,000 pound deposit is going to go on this garden, and I want to know what my best course of action is over the next two weeks. The landlord complained about the garden when the grass was very long, but once we had cut and sorted it, they were still not 'happy' with the state of it, although they couldn't tell us what was wrong!

Should I be returfing the entire garden despite much of the damage to it being due to a very hot summer, or should I just be cutting it as cleanly as possible and perhaps reseeding it and how try to lose the least amount of my deposit over it?

i would just and try and do your utmost to seed it although it may not grow quick enough b4 you leave. perhaps worth getting an estimate of how much it would cost to have it re-turfed so u can prepare yourselves. not sure where u are from but we have just had a quote to remove leatherjackets from lawn, treat, remove turf, rotivate and lay new turf for £400 inc vat.

Poppy35
13-03-2007, 18:40 PM
We are shortly moving out a property that we have been tenant of for a year. When we moved in, the garden in the property was perfectly and professionally cut, weeded and newly turfed.

We let the grass grow a little in the hot summer, it then dried out and now although the grass is cut back and there are no weeds, there are rather large patches of no grass and it doesn't look great.

I'm terrified a good section of my 1,000 pound deposit is going to go on this garden, and I want to know what my best course of action is over the next two weeks. The landlord complained about the garden when the grass was very long, but once we had cut and sorted it, they were still not 'happy' with the state of it, although they couldn't tell us what was wrong!

Should I be returfing the entire garden despite much of the damage to it being due to a very hot summer, or should I just be cutting it as cleanly as possible and perhaps reseeding it and how try to lose the least amount of my deposit over it?

i would just and try and do your utmost to seed it although it may not grow quick enough b4 you leave. perhaps worth getting an estimate of how much it would cost to have it re-turfed so u can prepare yourselves. not sure where u are from but we have just had a quote to remove leatherjackets from lawn, treat, remove turf, rotivate and lay new turf for £400 inc vat. and thats for an average sized garden in a modern house that we manage.

cillitbanger
13-03-2007, 19:39 PM
our landlord is withholding our deposit for exactly the same thing and want nearly £2,000!!!
So be warned:mad:

Poppy35
13-03-2007, 20:30 PM
our landlord is withholding our deposit for exactly the same thing and want nearly £2,000!!!
So be warned:mad:

what?????????????????????????????????????????????? how big is the darn garden??? Is this why u were asking about the N1 on the other thread?

thats just ridiculous!!

Worldlife
13-03-2007, 20:44 PM
Was the lawn cropped very short when you moved in (presumably in winter) ? About what length?

You wrote you let the grass grow in the summer but despite this action it dried out a little.

When did the landlord ask you to cut the grass and about how long was it then? The landlord's advice could perhaps have resulted in damage to the lawn in a dry period. Were there any dead patches at that point of time?

If the landlord was unhappy with the condition of the lawn after you had cut it then surely he should have asked the contractor who laid it for advice. Are the patches sporadically distributed are can you see any specific areas that are problems (e.g. under trees or bushes or in a line). For all you know the new turves could have been laid over poor soil containing debris.

What are the exact terms of your tenancy agreement concerning maintenance of the garden?

Are you on metered water supply? Was there a hosepipe ban in force over summer.

I'm not sure that it would be the right thing to do to arbitrarily replace the turves without the agreement of the landlord.

Maybe the best thing to do would be to write to the landlord asking that his contractor examine the lawn and determine what if any damage has been due to weather conditions or underlying soil problems and what, if any, of the cost of making good should be born by the tenant.

Once you receive the specification and estimate you will ask your own nominated contractor to look into the situation.

It is a known fact that very few tenants show an interest in garden maintenance or have gardening knowledge and it could well be even the landlord gave you the wrong advice to cut the lawn.

In my view the landlord or his gardening contractor should have provided the correct advice to minimise the risk of lawn damage during drought periods.

If you an the landlord cannot agree about the lawn before the ending of the tenancy my advice would be to issue a MoneyClaim online or a County Court claim for the return of the full amount of the deposit after giving the landlord notice that this is your intended course of action.

Worldlife
14-03-2007, 06:37 AM
The tenants who have been affected by deposit issues here are working on the basis that the lawn should be returned to the landlord in the same condition it was in when handed over to them.

Here's a novel thought! The contents of a property are subject to 'fair wear and tear' agreements to a landlord should not expect to get the full cost of a something like a carpet back. The amount to be held against the deposit would depend on the age of the carpet, the extent of the damage and the cost of repair - not replacement.

In the same way a lawn could suffer fair wear and tear. Was the lawn laid of ornamental quality or a turf that could stand use (particularly with tenants having children)?

One might suggest that drought conditions are the main cause of the damage in this case. Our own lawn suffered this summer but has given fertiliser and weedkillers and now, over the winter period has recovered.

I would suggest that it is the landlord's responsibility, in changing climate conditions, to provide the necessary care to ensure survival of lawns.

Tenant's should not expected to be expert gardeners!!!

Ruth Less
15-03-2007, 02:15 AM
i would just and try and do your utmost to seed it although it may not grow quick enough b4 you leave. perhaps worth getting an estimate of how much it would cost to have it re-turfed so u can prepare yourselves. not sure where u are from but we have just had a quote to remove leatherjackets from lawn, treat, remove turf, rotivate and lay new turf for £400 inc vat. and thats for an average sized garden in a modern house that we manage.

Who is paying for the work, the landlord or the tenant?

The lawn here has been devastated by leather jackets these last few months. Not just our garden but the neighbouring ones too, mainly I think because the turf is only a couple of years old and it is quite common for new turf to be infested. The turf wasn't that good anyway, typical builders turfing over a poorly drained area. I'm planning to reseed, but a tenant should not be held responsible for leather jacket damage should they?

cillitbanger
15-03-2007, 21:07 PM
Yes poppy indeed!
I asked who they were getting to do it? charlie dimmock?
:confused:

attilathelandlord
15-03-2007, 21:41 PM
It is my understanding that a tenant cannot be held responsible for a "living thing" i.e. houseplants, lawns, trees etc.

Force majeure.

Yes, the garden should be left tidy, grass cut etc. but as far as things left alive, then unless it was wilful or criminal damage then the tenant cannot be held responsible.

Remember the summer of 1976? Suppose there were such a drought again and a hosepipe ban to boot. Plants would die and the tenant would not be expected to pay for their replacement!

omostra06
16-03-2007, 11:39 AM
what has the landlord asked you to do? has he said he is keeping the deposit yet or that he is just unhappy with the garden.

Poppy35
16-03-2007, 13:44 PM
Yes poppy indeed!
I asked who they were getting to do it? charlie dimmock?


sounds about right, £300 for re-turfing and the rest to pay for the sight of charlie's hammocks swinging in the garden!!! :D

Worldlife
16-03-2007, 14:06 PM
It is my understanding that a tenant cannot be held responsible for a "living thing" i.e. houseplants, lawns, trees etc.

Force majeure.

Yes, the garden should be left tidy, grass cut etc. but as far as things left alive, then unless it was wilful or criminal damage then the tenant cannot be held responsible.

Remember the summer of 1976? Suppose there were such a drought again and a hosepipe ban to boot. Plants would die and the tenant would not be expected to pay for their replacement!

I agree totally with Attila on this here and this post seems to endorse my previous ones.

In my view tenants should only negotiate the cost of remedial work if there has been damage that is clearly their responsibility - e.g their dog or a visitors dog digging holes in the lawn. Mole damage I would suggest would clearly be landlord's responsibility to put right.

Paragon
16-03-2007, 14:09 PM
Ant hills are probably open to debate as well as fox pee.

arlow11
21-03-2007, 23:27 PM
surely unless all the grass in the area is dead,youre gonna have to pay or get some seeds....................... or kill all the grass in the area:)

Worldlife
22-03-2007, 03:50 AM
Don't agree with arlow......

What if it is a small lawn and Paragon's fox was an incontinent bitch! :D