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Heavenly Reaction
02-03-2007, 15:33 PM
Hi,

we are in a rented house and the landlord gave us 2 months notice as he wants to sell the property and the 2 months co-incides with the end of our current tenancy agreement. This is fine, it's inconvinient, but he's within his rights.

But i'm getting really worried about the estate agents just barging into the house. I asked them for 24 hours notice for viewings, and I will try my best to say yes. but they are being really annoying by saying that they can just let themselves in if needed and not listening to me when i say I want to be there. I am really security conscious and now i daren't go out incase they come round when i'm not in. I also have 3 cats that I don't want to be let out.

We're still paying full rent (which is quite high) and all of the property in the house is ours, so I think that our rights to live in the house as we want to until we move out. They are also saying that we have to keep the place completely clean and tidy incase there are any viewings - but it's kinda hard when you're packing!

it seems that as we are paying rent untill the end of the tenanacy we should have some rights in this situation, but when you have people with keys to your house and wanting to let themselves in regardless of what you say, it really worries me.

Could you let me know what rights i have, can I refuse entry if it is inconvinient - I'm not trying to be difficult, as i will let them do viewings as long as its reasonable. What do I do if they do just let themselves in?

Thanks

P.Pilcher
02-03-2007, 15:37 PM
Your rights are very simple: You are entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of the property until you move out. You therefore have an absolute right to refuse admission to any estate agent, viewer or any body connected with your landlord if you wish despite what it may say in your tenancy agreement.

P.P.

Paragon
02-03-2007, 15:41 PM
The letting agent should be nicer to you. Explain to them in a pleasant way that you are willing to cooperate, but under your terms, not theirs.

Heavenly Reaction
02-03-2007, 15:41 PM
thanks thats great

At least I know that I don't have to say yes all of the time and that I can live peacefully.

This forum is great, thanks so much for your help.

:)

Bel
02-03-2007, 23:24 PM
This topic is posted on quite often; members have even recommended people temporarily change locks if you feel under threat of people letting themselves in while you are out. Even if it says not to in the agreement.

Worldlife
03-03-2007, 04:49 AM
Hi,

we are in a rented house and the landlord gave us 2 months notice as he wants to sell the property and the 2 months co-incides with the end of our current tenancy agreement. This is fine, it's inconvinient, but he's within his rights. <snip>



Was this a formal and correct headed notice under Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 requiring possession of the property? There are many threads on this forum about the errors that can arise on Section 21 notices to make than ineffective.

You have security of tenure at the property even if a formal notice has been correctly served. The landlord cannot remove you from the property without obtaining an Order for Possession from the Court.

If you do change the locks, as you are entitled to do so, do inform the landlord/agent that has been done because they will not be able to use their existing keys should there be an emergency situation. If you have an emergency keyholder you might be prepared to inform the landlord/agent of the contact address.

nick..
03-03-2007, 14:10 PM
Change the locks. Now.