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Ericthelobster
14-06-2005, 09:08 AM
I'd be interested to hear how experienced landlords set about this. Obviously buying decisions for a rental property are completely different to those for your own home; due to greater wear and tear from tenants and the need to keep the place looking new and attractive for new tenants. For example...

Conventional wisdom (and carpet salesmen) says that underlay quality is as important as the carpet itself and you shouldn't scrimp on it. But for a rental, is it worth even fitting underlay at all? Or even (yeuch) just fitting new carpet on top of the old?

How often do you reckon on having to change the carpets in a property inhabited by a succession of short-term tenants?

How much do you normally pay per square metre?

Do you deliberately carpet the whole property with same stuff?

What colour - beigey browns throughout?

I'm talking about run-of-the-mill properties here, rather than top-end where obviously you'd expect high quality carpets to match the cost of the rent. Will be interested to see the replies!

Jennifer_M
14-06-2005, 11:28 AM
Conventional wisdom (and carpet salesmen) says that underlay quality is as important as the carpet itself and you shouldn't scrimp on it. But for a rental, is it worth even fitting underlay at all? Or even (yeuch) just fitting new carpet on top of the old?

How often do you reckon on having to change the carpets in a property inhabited by a succession of short-term tenants?

Do you deliberately carpet the whole property with same stuff?

What colour - beigey browns throughout?


I'm not a landlord but this is what common sense says to me (as well as experience as a tenant):

- Start with a good installation of reasonably good carpet; get some hard wearing one (not sure if they have a name, but the ones used in places where a lot of people walk around). This way you should be able to change it less often than the cheap stuff that will get used within a few months.
Get it properly installed as well as poorly installed carpets deteriorate on edges and corner if not done properly.

- Change the carpets when they are in a state where you wouldn't want to live in the house yourself.

- Carpet wherever you like with whatever you like (hallways, entrance and lounge being used more than bedrooms usually), but avoid carpets in bathroom, kitchen and toilets. Very unhygienic and smelly.

- I personnaly wouldn't use beige/brown. Reasons are: beige gets dirty extremely quickly. You don't notice it until you try to clean a stain and end up with a clean beige patch on a browny carpet.
Brown is depressing I think.
Looking at houses I found that grey is a good colour for carpets: it goes well with most neutral colours, dirt doesn't show as much even though the colour is light enough.

Nora Kay
14-06-2005, 22:18 PM
Try black for heavily used areas like hall and stairs. We bought a small house 10 years ago complete with a black, Berber type carpet in lounge and hall and stairs. We replaced the lounge carpet with beige ( and have had to replace it twice since), but the stairs carpet is still going strong - very tough and stains just don't show. Its OK for smallish area, and would team up quite stylishly with a grey lounge carpet suggested above I think.

SteveP
14-06-2005, 23:12 PM
You can come and be my interior desinger Nora :D

Gailforce
15-06-2005, 21:57 PM
Aren't laminated wood flooring the thing to put in rented properties, which look modern, clean etc - certainly my tenants prefer them to carpet! :)

LMT
16-06-2005, 11:25 AM
Advice shown above is good. 4 extra points you may find useful:
1) I often use a deep peachy coloured carpet as it doesn't show stains / wear much but makes a place look warm and goes well with the predictably magnolia walls!
2) get a decent sized area of matting installed by the front door. This looks neater than a doormat stuck on top (doesn't curl up or move around), and even if people don't wipe their feet on the way in, at least they walk over it. If it is an upstairs flat, cover the whole of the downstairs stairwell in this matting.
3) find a good carpet fitter first and get him to measure up before you do your ordering. Most carpet shops will have a list - ask them who's the top man. I have always used a fitter who goes in to do the measuring first, he tells me how much I need to buy, then I go back to the shop with the order. Usually I can get the fitter to agree to collect the carpet himself as he goes to the shop all the time - so no transport issues. I've always found that (unsurprisingly) the fitter has much more experience of estimating than the bloke in the shop does. Also he has no financial interest in selling you too much carpet, whereas the shop do.
4) if you can find a decent carpet warehouse shop, the stuff off the roll is usually fine, pick an 80/20 mix - felt backed or hessian backed (never foam- it disintegrates). Use a twist pile - loop pile carpets cannot be seamlessly joined as the cut edge always shows - so you end up buying more so the fitter doesn't have to make a join across the middle of a large room.