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View Full Version : Please can anyone give me some advice on 'Cold House' due to Windows



damhouse
19-12-2011, 07:09 AM
Hello

I typed in Google 'Cold House' and it lead me onto this site!

I am the Tenant living in a Private Rented House.

We moved into our 4 bedroom property in March 2011, our tenancy ends or renews in March 2012. I have 3 children 10, 6 and 1 years old.

My 6 year old has Asthma and now my 1 year old has Asthma and has been giving a puffer. They are both constantly ill with cough's and I am always at the Doctors.

These past few weeks we have been making weekly calls to the Estate Agents as our house is FREEZING. They have since sent a window man out to give a quote, he even said it will be very un-likely the Landlord will agree as we have 4 massive bay windows in the house alone and it's going to be very expensive.

There is a new combi boiler in the house, whether it's man enough to heat this large house I don't know?

The main problem is the windows. They are very old. They are called Grittle's with lead work.

The temp of the house when the heating isn't on is below 10c and when it is on the temperature when the house is 12c

When we turn the heating on it's just going out the windows, and we just cannot seem to keep the house warm.

And when we turn the heating off as we just cannot afford to keep the heating on constantly the heat is gone within half and hour.

And now the temperature outside has dropped the house just isn't getting warm, when the heating is on.

The children are going to bed in their Pj's and jumpers and have extra blanket's on their beds.

During the day we are in thick jumpers and warm clothing.

I honestly do not know what to do any more, Or where to go?

I did call the Housing department at the Council (South Glouc) But they weren't of much help?

I would be so grateful if anyone can give me any advice?

Thank You so much

Damhouse

jjlandlord
19-12-2011, 07:48 AM
The temp of the house when the heating isn't on is below 10c and when it is on the temperature when the house is 12c

Well, at that temperature I think that the heating system does not comply with housing health and safety regulations.
So you could nicely point that out to the agent/landlord, then contact your council's Environmental Health Officer if no action is taken (though in such case you might be prepared to move).

A priori changing the windows may not be the only option. E.g. a secondary glazing could be installed.

On the down side, I think that the landlord could just provide electric heaters, which would solve the temperature issue, but not the cost issue...

Darth Wookie
19-12-2011, 07:53 AM
This may sound a bit harsh but you took on the property knowing what kind of windows were present, knowing the room sizes and knowing that winter comes round each year.
The LL has supplied a combi boiler (which will have been selected based on house size). It's perfectly acceptable to wear jumpers indoors, and it's perfectly norml for a property to cool down once the heating is switched off. That's why most people expect to pay more during the winter.
I simply don't see what the LL has done wrong here. If you are not happy, leave when the tenancy ends in March and find a more modern property.
Sorry I can't offer anything more positive to the debate.

westminster
19-12-2011, 09:51 AM
The simplest solution is most likely to be for you to move out at the end of the fixed term in March, and next time, study the EPC rating and check the insulation and whether there is double glazing before agreeing to rent the property.

Whilst the EHO could, as jjlandlord says, order the landlord to address the problem (under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System, excess cold is a hazard), it could have financial consequences for you; either in terms of fuel bills (if the EHO tells the LL to install extra heating), or a rent increase (LL may decide to up the rent to cover the cost of new windows or secondary glazing).

Snorkerz
19-12-2011, 10:12 AM
May I slao suggest you look at your curtains? Bein big windows, they will be expensive but that is why large windows often have the thinnest (cheapest) possible curtains. Decent curtains will make a huge difference. They don't have to break the bank if your willing/able to make your own &/or use charity shops. Google 'recycled furniture' in your town.

shevans
19-12-2011, 12:31 PM
We lived in a similar house two years ago, Tudor property with no wall insulation, ill fitting doors and very old leaded windows. At the time it was just over £600 a month to heat and the maximum temperature the house got to was 13C.

Luckily the landlord accepted the issue and provided us with half price rent for the winter months whilst we looked for another property to move to.

We did go to a charity shop and bought old duvets / eiderdowns and nailed them over some of the windows which helped considerably. Also using electric fan heaters pointing into the room (rather than warming the wall / outside of the house) made the house bearable. We also used some decorators corking around the gaps in the glass to stop some of the drafts.

Only real option is to move.

mariner
19-12-2011, 14:07 PM
Most suggestions have been made
Heavy full length curtains for bay windows
draught excluders for doors
even sticking plastic film on inside of windows may reduce heat loss
14.5 tog duvets or add 4.5 tog to 10 tog in same duvet case
If single rads, may be LL will consider replacing with double rads if boiler can cope
Is the loft insulated to current standards?

LL is unlikely to replace windows.

You could investigate what energy efficiency grants you / LL may be eligible for. Energy Co's are offering some good deals on loft/cavity insulation at the moment.