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96lwilliamsd
03-10-2011, 12:52 PM
Hi all

I have a question, I have been in a 6 month shorthold assurred tenancy agreement. It finishes on 23rd December 2011. I have already received the letter asking if I wanted to renew our contract. However on our current contract agreement we agreed to pay rent on 24th of each month in advance. We have been finding paying on the date increasingly hard because It's before we get paid (our fault) We was wondering if we can change the payment date on a new 6 month contract ?
While in our current agreement we asked if we could change but estate agents were being a pain and saying no you signed to say you would pay on 24th and that's it! We Only want to moved it forward 2 days ! And we would pay in advance the two days. Would like to here people's opinions/experience
Thanks in advance
Dave

Snorkerz
03-10-2011, 13:38 PM
24th is the 'official' date that each tenancy period commences so the agents are kind-of right. However, many tenancies have rent days that do not coincide with the first day of the period - sometimes for the tenants benefit, more-often for the landlords or agents.

First thing to do is to contact the LANDLORD and see how he would feel if you simply paid the rent 2 days late every month.

Another option s that you don't have to sign a new agreement - the law asys that once your fixed term is over you get a statutory periodic tenancy (ie you can't just be turfed out). Why not tell the agency that you'll sign a new tenancy agreement on the condition that it starts on whatever date. So, your current contract would be until the 23rd, 24th to (say) 26th would be a SPT and your new agreement would start on the 28th, with rent due very 28th.

No one has to agree to any of the above - but frankly, if you pay your rent 2 days late every month there is little that could be done until the end of the next contract, and even then it is unlikely the landlord would want the costs and risks of evicting & changing tenants for a relatively minor issue.