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May
16-07-2010, 15:37 PM
I am selling my flat quite cheaply due to financial difficulties and everything is up to date as regards recent gas check certificate even though the gas is blocked off and has not been used for a long time. I believe I have kept everything up to the present date including of course all service charges etc. Now the buyers solicitor has contacted my solicitor stating that he also requires an electricity safety certificate as well. I am a little upset by this as I have already just payed over £900 by invoice in the last few months as Wolverhampton Homes (the landlords) have carried out some work out on the roof of the flats (my flat is 1st floor and they also put in the digital arial systems as they said Sky dishes was unsightly. I suppose what I really want to know is an electrical safety check certificate a legal requirement. My brother's (retired qualified electricians installed new smoke detectors and did a check on the electrics and said it was all good, but as they are retired how do I stand. Of course if it is a legal requirement then I will have to find the money to pay for one. I appreciate all replies.

thesaint
16-07-2010, 15:42 PM
I am selling my flat quite cheaply due to financial difficulties and everything is up to date as regards recent gas check certificate even though the gas is blocked off and has not been used for a long time. I believe I have kept everything up to the present date including of course all service charges etc. Now the buyers solicitor has contacted my solicitor stating that he also requires an electricity safety certificate as well. I am a little upset by this as I have already just payed over £900 by invoice in the last few months as Wolverhampton Homes (the landlords) have carried out some work out on the roof of the flats (my flat is 1st floor and they also put in the digital arial systems as they said Sky dishes was unsightly. I suppose what I really want to know is an electrical safety check certificate a legal requirement. My brother's (retired qualified electricians installed new smoke detectors and did a check on the electrics and said it was all good, but as they are retired how do I stand. Of course if it is a legal requirement then I will have to find the money to pay for one. I appreciate all replies.

I don't believe it is, but why don't you ask your solicitor?

Springfields
16-07-2010, 16:02 PM
No

If your selling a property then if the purchaser wants to make checks that is for their own peace of mind.

Perhaps as you have supplied a gas certificate for the property they are making an assumption that the electric will be there also? - I suppose the only question which matters to you is will this effect the sale should you not have it done.

Snorkerz
16-07-2010, 16:20 PM
No legal obligation to have one unless the property is a HMO - and presumably your flat isn't.

P.Pilcher
16-07-2010, 17:09 PM
Mortgage providers often require some reassurance as to the state of the electrics in a property that they are being asked to lend money on - hence the request. It isn't legally necessary, but if you want to sell it to this particular purchaser.........

P.P.

schocca
16-07-2010, 18:42 PM
No

If your selling a property then if the purchaser wants to make checks that is for their own peace of mind.

Perhaps as you have supplied a gas certificate for the property they are making an assumption that the electric will be there also? - I suppose the only question which matters to you is will this effect the sale should you not have it done.

I'm a bit surprised that the gas safety was supplied. The purchaser of the house is buying at their risk - With the gas safety, it does NOT mean it's safe - it just means it passed a safety check when the test was carried out (just like the MOT on a car). The same applies re the electrical safety certificate as well.

You don't need to provide an electrical safety certificate for house sales. You may need to provide "Part P" completion certificates for any electrical work carried out over the last few years, but that's it. If the buyer wants an electrical safety certificate, it's up to them to carry out the test.

On a personal note, I would be very conservative about paying for any tests that they want - if only because it can provide "extra ammo" to try and reduce the price further. And I would be concerned regarding the liability of the certificate - i.e. if you did have a test done + certificate produced, who is taking liability if there was an electrical problem with the property post purchase?

Tell the buyer that you would be happy for them to carry out their own checks if they want... and let them organise it + pay for it.

May
17-07-2010, 17:02 PM
Thanks everyone for your advice I suppose it is really down to me now. As I said my flat is going so cheap, and as you say there is always a chance that if I dont get this E-certificate for the new buyer he may pull out or have a plan for me to reduce the flat price. If I did do that I may as well just give it away lol.Thanks people.

Springfields
17-07-2010, 17:53 PM
I'm a bit surprised that the gas safety was supplied. The purchaser of the house is buying at their risk - With the gas safety, it does NOT mean it's safe - it just means it passed a safety check when the test was carried out (just like the MOT on a car). The same applies re the electrical safety certificate as well.

Perhaps the gas cert was provided as gas is switched off - or because it was available from a previous tenancy?

But spot on you may want to keep them sweet with contributing however it is their discretion if they want it or not ...... if the mortgage company has specified ie the surveyor has concerns you may want to consider it more seriously.

As has been mentioned this can be a foot in the door to start extra negotiations on price - anything over 10 years old will reccommend updating/repalcement.