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View Full Version : Shouls I be given compenstion



katrinahale
04-02-2010, 19:33 PM
Hi

I have been renting my house since nov 2009 and 1 week before xmas the boiler stopped working. I notified the landlord who struggled to find a plumber to come. I went away for a few days between xmas and new year and upon my return i was informed that the landlord had let a plumber in whilst i was away without notice. The landlord then informed me that the plumber was coming to fit the new part, he then failed to turn up on 2 separate occasions. The landlord then got another plumber to come and he ordered another part which took over another week to come so altogether I was without heating or hot water (except a shower) for approx 5 weeks. The landlord did provide me with electric heaters but because the electrics in the house are old if I plugged them in it overloaded the system and the electric would trip so i had to use the gas fire. Due to that my bills are a lot more than usual. I asked for a little off the rent but was told that it was not her fault that there was adverse weather and that she had to order a part and that she did provide heaters. I feel that it was not my fault either and the contract says it should be repaired in a reasonable time ! what is classed as a reasonable time and should I recieve a discount on my rent any help would be apprecated thanks

tom999
04-02-2010, 19:45 PM
Is the boiler working now?

Are all electric sockets in the entire house unusable?

katrinahale
04-02-2010, 19:52 PM
The bioler is now working all the sockets are working except one in the kitchen that I had to get an electrician out for and he said the cooker had not been wired properly and was conected via a plug which had burnt the socket out I had it repaired as it was dangerous. The electrician said that the electric system was old and only supported 20 instead of 32 which meant that you can only use limited appliances at any one time or it will overload.

It was so bad when heating not working i had an icicle on the kitchen tap !!

P.Pilcher
04-02-2010, 19:58 PM
It strikes me that your landlord has done everything reasonable to get your boiler working again, which you did not facilitate by going away without making arrangements for your landlord's contractor to gain access. Fortunately for you, your landlord admitted this contractor to your home in order to repair the boiler as quickly as possible although, in reality, she should not have done this. If the boiler is now working, I should forget the incident and carry on with your life. If you owned the property and had to find your own contractor, would you be complaining like this?

P.P.

westminster
04-02-2010, 20:07 PM
Due to that my bills are a lot more than usual. I asked for a little off the rent but was told that it was not her fault that there was adverse weather and that she had to order a part and that she did provide heaters. I feel that it was not my fault either and the contract says it should be repaired in a reasonable time ! what is classed as a reasonable time and should I recieve a discount on my rent any help would be apprecated thanks
It sounds to me as if LL did everything she could to remedy the problem and did so in a reasonable time. I don't think you have any grounds for compensation.

If you are concerned that the electrics are unsafe, contact the LL first, and if she fails to investigate, contact the environmental health officer at the council.

Mars Mug
05-02-2010, 07:56 AM
If you owned the property and had to find your own contractor, would you be complaining like this?

This isn’t meant to be a dig at you, but I’ve seen that type of comment many times on this forum.

There’s a big difference between owning your own property and paying someone else to rent their property. In paying someone else the mortgage rate for a property I think it’s reasonable to expect a level of service beyond what you might personally accept or tolerate for your own home. If your heating was out of action for those early weeks in January you would not have been happy I expect? Do you think your efforts to get heating and hot water working again for your own home would exceed the landlord’s efforts in this case, would it take you five weeks to sort out for your own home?

Having said all that I think the chances of the OP convincing the landlord that some compensation is appropriate are slim to none.

mind the gap
05-02-2010, 08:28 AM
This isn’t meant to be a dig at you, but I’ve seen that type of comment many times on this forum.

There’s a big difference between owning your own property and paying someone else to rent their property. In paying someone else the mortgage rate for a property I think it’s reasonable to expect a level of service beyond what you might personally accept or tolerate for your own home. If your heating was out of action for those early weeks in January you would not have been happy I expect? Do you think your efforts to get heating and hot water working again for your own home would exceed the landlord’s efforts in this case, would it take you five weeks to sort out for your own home?

Having said all that I think the chances of the OP convincing the landlord that some compensation is appropriate are slim to none.
I agree with Mars Mug on both points.

The analogy with' how long a householder can expect to wait' only holds up to a point, since a householder is making a capital gain on the property; a LL is making that, plus a profit from the tenant. The tenant has a roof over his head, but no lasting security of tenure. It is not the same. If I were a tenant, I would expect my LL to get the boiler repaired as quickly as humanly possible, even if it meant 'going the extra mile'. 5 weeks is not 'as quickly as possible', although extra heaters were supplied.

In fact it is not unreasonable to expect the LL to take out emergency boiler cover, preferably with the boiler manufacturer, who are usually the best people to get spare parts quickly and fit them correctly. Do you not think that too many LLs see boiler breakdown in their rental properties as a minor irritation and feel aggrieved at the cost to themselves, conveniently forgetting that heating and hot water are essential to Ts wellbeing?

I'll get off my soapbox now :)

Telometer
05-02-2010, 15:27 PM
since a householder is making a capital gain on the property; a LL is making that, plus a profit from the tenant. The tenant has a roof over his head, but no lasting security of tenure. It is not the same. If I were a tenant, I would expect my LL to get the boiler repaired as quickly as humanly possible, even if it meant 'going the extra mile'. 5 weeks is not 'as quickly as possible', although extra heaters were supplied.


Whilst I agree that as quickly as possible for a tenant should be faster than you might do it in your own home, I don't understand the references to gains and profits.

A householder has a roof over his head and it is his responsibility to be as slow as he wishes.

A L provides a roof over the head of T, and it is L's legal responsibility s11 LTA to provide heating. L&T have a commercial arrangement.

mind the gap
05-02-2010, 15:35 PM
... I don't understand the references to gains and profits...L&T have a commercial arrangement.

Ah, well, Telometer, that's because I have a heart... and you have a rusty baked-bean tin instead.:D