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Fruitloop
06-11-2009, 11:48 AM
Hi

Our long term tenant has given notice. She made us aware some time ago that she had damaged the lounge carpet with her iron and is aware that it will need to be replaced. My question is this: the flat currently has the same carpet throughout. We can no longer obtain this carpet and will have to therefore either have different carpet in the lounge or replace the carpet throughout the entire flat. Ideally (for aesthetic purposes) we would have preferred to have kept the same carpet throughout - where do we stand with what we can recoup financially from her?

Regards

Fruitloop

jeffrey
06-11-2009, 11:53 AM
For how long a term has T resided? Iron-damage is not fair wear and tear, but you would have to downvalue even an un-iron-damaged carpet to take account of reasonable depreciation in value caused by normal usage.

Fruitloop
06-11-2009, 11:56 AM
Thanks for your quick response

Five years eight months

Fruitloop

jeffrey
06-11-2009, 11:57 AM
Thanks for your quick response

Five years eight months

Fruitloop
A five year- and eight month- old carpet undamaged but used reasonably by T would be worth only a fraction of its new/replacement value.

Fruitloop
06-11-2009, 12:06 PM
Ok - but I am a bit confused on this one. If there was no carpet burn, we would not need to replace and would not expect to take any more from her deposit for the wear and tear. However, because it does need replacing, should she not be financially liable for the cost of that replacement?

Or is it that she is only legally obliged to replace it with a similarly worn one? (penny dropping moment!)

Are there guidelines as to what % reductions we should be using?

Fruitloop

Poppy
06-11-2009, 12:12 PM
Is that the only damage, apart from fair wear and tear? Are you really going to take money from someone that has paid rent consistently for nearly six years?

After nearly six years a carpet is virtually worthless anyway. Let the relationship end on a good note and freshen up the property for your hopefully equally as good, new tenants.

Fruitloop
06-11-2009, 12:22 PM
Thanks Poppy - valid point and I hadn't really thought of it like that

Fruitloop

westminster
06-11-2009, 12:45 PM
http://www.arla.co.uk/infosheets/list.aspx?id=7#

Click on the heading entitled "Avoiding Betterment and Considering Apportionment" - then scroll right down to the bottom of the page, where's there's a table for calculating appropriate compensation.

Snorkerz
06-11-2009, 12:46 PM
Got to go with Poppy on this one....

You can not charge T for goods that will improve the property beyond the condition it was in when the tenancy began - LESS wear and tear. Ie you can't expect to have her pay for a new carpet to replace a 5 year old one.

This is my formula in these instances....

A) Life expectancy of product (carpet - 7 years?)
B) Current age of product
C) Original (not replacement) cost

Current value of damaged item is C divided by (A-B)

Snorkerz
06-11-2009, 12:48 PM
http://www.arla.co.uk/infosheets/list.aspx?id=7#

Click on the heading entitled "Avoiding Betterment and Considering Apportionment" - then scroll right down to the bottom of the page, where's there's a table for calculating appropriate compensation.

Oooh - thats pretty much how mine works too!

Fruitloop
06-11-2009, 14:33 PM
Thanks everyone - all great advices - very much appreciated

Regards

Fruitloop

westminster
06-11-2009, 14:43 PM
Oooh - thats pretty much how mine works too!

Yours is a lot simpler! :)