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View Full Version : Damp - What constitutes lifestyle damage?



Rushmore
03-11-2009, 12:08 PM
Hi

I've rented my flat for almost a year now and have a good relationship with the landlord, he's coming over tonight to discuss some damp and I was wondering what my rights are.

To set the scene:

- I live in a flat in which the two bedrooms 'stick out' from the main building, therefore the 'bedroom window wall' and the floor near it have open space on the other side and under them rather than more building.
- The flat has no ventilation apart from the actual windows (no vents within the windows).
- The flat heating is overnight storage heaters.

Basically we've discovered damp on the two bedroom walls (manifested in condensation on the windows each morning), turning into the dreaded black mould. I've since (permanently) moved the furniture from that wall, cleaned it all up and put moisture absorbers on each window-sill. The damp refreshes at night when we sleep in the room, and is not caused by drying washing etc.

I'm pretty convinced that the damp is a combination of a) not great insulation of the walls and windows in the bedroom (they are cold to touch) and b) not getting much ventilation in the winter (no problem in the summer). I'm not expecting my landlord to do anything about the insulation issue (though it is his problem), but I don't want to be held responsible for damp damage to areas I cannot easily clean resulting from (b).

To the point (at last...) one of the causes of the problem is probably that I do not open the windows in winter. It could be argued that I should be doing this and that any damage resulting is my problem. My response would be that as the heating is storage heating (as in relies on trickling out heat throughout the day/night cycle), if I open a window in the cold winter months, I will loose all the residue heat, effectively ruining the heating.

So, is it reasonable for the landlord to expect me to have the windows open every day in the winter, even if it means the heating is rendered practically useless and the apartment becomes cold?

Any advice greatly appreciated

Nick

theartfullodger
03-11-2009, 12:35 PM
Advise LL you are considering inviting council round for an HHSRS risk assessment... see....
http://www.communities.gov.uk/housing/rentingandletting/housinghealth/

I'm sure he'll want to do the right thing..

Cheers!

Lodger

Telometer
03-11-2009, 12:38 PM
Prompted by theartfullodger's post, the best solution for L would be for him to provide you with a dehumidifier and to pay for the electricity it will use.