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View Full Version : Damp specialist who won't advise DPC but offer solution



Kittie
22-10-2009, 19:55 PM
We've put an offer on a house (built 1900-1920), which has localised damp - a stain about 12in x 12in on the inside of an external wall. The stain isn't mouldy, salty, or moist. It's just a darkened patch in the paint.

We want to get it checked out by someone who will help us find the source of the probem and fix it, but not recommend a damp proofing course which we gather is a bit of a con.

Can anyone recommend an expert who we can contact who can provide us with this?

(p.s. i've read with interest the threads on damp/ventilation on this forum, but which specific experts will provide this advice hasn't been covered that i can see)

Ericthelobster
22-10-2009, 20:20 PM
You might want to have a look at http://www.property-care.org/ in the first instance?

Telometer
23-10-2009, 10:37 AM
http://www.bricksandbrass.co.uk/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=565 might help.

Kittie
23-10-2009, 19:29 PM
that looks helpful - thanks!

Bel
23-10-2009, 23:31 PM
How about these guys

http://www.heritage-house.org/

There is also a link to a very long article on damp with a rather dodgy translation.

mind the gap
23-10-2009, 23:38 PM
Interesting! First time I've seen a politically abusive ad for damp treatment.

Has anyone tried linseed paints for external woodwork? Any good?

Sad S
24-10-2009, 13:34 PM
We want to get it checked out by someone who will help us find the source of the probem and fix it, but not recommend a damp proofing course which we gather is a bit of a con.



Well, a damp proofing course worked a treat for one of our damp problems. But if what you have is penetrating damp a DPC will be of no use at all. Anyone who sells a "solution" will have a vested interest in finding their kind of damp.

How old is the property? What kind of construction? Is there a cavity wall? Are the rainwater goods in good order?

Why not employ a chartered surveyor to inspect, report and recommend?

Kittie
26-10-2009, 10:45 AM
Bel - I gave Heritage House an email - I read that with interest too! They haven't gotten back to me, I'll give them a call today.

Sad S - the property seems in good condition. It's pebble dashed and 1900-1920 build. It appears to be localised damp. The vested interest concern, is definitely what we want to avoid. I've contacted a chartered surveyor who quoted £500 not for a full survey, just to check this issue. A bit steep, but I don't mind paying it if I'm sure that it's the right person to contact who can find a solution

Sad S
26-10-2009, 11:09 AM
Sad S - the property seems in good condition. It's pebble dashed and 1900-1920 build. It appears to be localised damp. The vested interest concern, is definitely what we want to avoid. I've contacted a chartered surveyor who quoted £500 not for a full survey, just to check this issue. A bit steep, but I don't mind paying it if I'm sure that it's the right person to contact who can find a solution

Pebble dash is a render almost certainly on top of bricks which are not external quality. The render can easily acquire a localised crack, which frost will worsen (think of last February) and then damp penetrates the wall at that spot. What can you see on the outside of this damp patch? Perhaps there are water pipes running down the cavity, if the wall has a cavity which it probably doesn't given the age of the property. Where is the down pipe from the gutters outside?

For a thorough investigation, you need the surveyor to check the whole house for damp. Last year, we paid £375 for a similar survey of a ground floor flat - so half a house effectively. [He found various things of which we were unaware, but the solutions to many of them were quite trivial in cost - cutting back vegetation, altering the slope on a step, for instance].

If you think of the cost of a survey in terms of protecting your investment for the future then it can more than pay for itself. Make sure you get a Chartered Surveyor.

SS

Telometer
26-10-2009, 14:04 PM
A chartered surveyor can work for a pushy damp-solution product company just as well as can a second hand car seller.

jeffrey
26-10-2009, 16:58 PM
So use an independent Chartered Surveyor, not such an employeee.

Bel
26-10-2009, 19:00 PM
Bel - I gave Heritage House an email - I read that with interest too! They haven't gotten back to me, I'll give them a call today.

Sad S - the property seems in good condition. It's pebble dashed and 1900-1920 build. It appears to be localised damp. The vested interest concern, is definitely what we want to avoid. I've contacted a chartered surveyor who quoted £500 not for a full survey, just to check this issue. A bit steep, but I don't mind paying it if I'm sure that it's the right person to contact who can find a solution

I find builders are slow at email; call to mobile works best

Snorkerz
19-12-2009, 10:41 AM
I'd just like to back up "Sad S" suggestion. I had a chartered surveyor check out a damp peroblem in my rental property. They told me the cause of the problem, and exactly what was and what wasn't required to fix it 'properly' plus an idea of the costs a builder would charge. There was no advertising / promotion of any buider or product and I got 3 copies of the written report that I can use when I do eventually contract someone.

The cost for this - £100. Not cheap, but I thought it was excellent value. You may have to shop around as my quotes for a chartered surveyor varied between £100 and £365 for the same report.