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MrAngry
07-02-2009, 19:05 PM
I am sure a normal law abiding respectable member of society would be mortified but does getting a ccj against you really make any difference to your life when you are not working, not tax paying and claiming whatever benefit you can claim, whether due to it or not and already have debt collection letters dropping on your doorstep?

mind the gap
07-02-2009, 19:19 PM
I am sure a normal law abiding respectable member of society would be mortified but does getting a ccj against you really make any difference to your life when you are not working, not tax paying and claiming whatever benefit you can claim, whether due to it or not and already have debt collection letters dropping on your doorstep?

Are you inviting us to engage in a philosophical debate, or do you just want us to say 'yes' or 'no'?

Give us a clue.

MrAngry
07-02-2009, 19:23 PM
The question would be, how much does it hurt them and does it stop them actually doing anything?
That is probably 2 questions, sorry

jax2503
07-02-2009, 19:32 PM
Yes I feel it does make a difference. If a person has a CCJ, you would then apply to the court for a warrant of execution which costs approx £55 then the bailiffs can levy on goods. The question on wether or not to pursue someone through the county courts is another debate. If someone has no assets and no ways of repaying you, then I personally feel that there is no point in taking them through and obtaining a CCJ as it would only be on principle grounds. I feel that the CCJ route is for someone who "can pay wont pay" not someone who "cant pay, wont pay", although that is just my personal opinion.

As for someone on benenfits who has no intention on working then it isnt really worth it. Just write if off and move on if there is no chance of success.

Jax

MrAngry
07-02-2009, 19:40 PM
Thanks, thats a really good way to look at it.

In your experience how much does it cost to get a ccj against someone in the first place if they owe you money?
ie. with court fees and any extra bits you end up having to pay/outlay and timefactor

redex
07-02-2009, 23:31 PM
I feel that the CCJ route is for someone who "can pay wont pay" not someone who "cant pay, wont pay", although that is just my personal opinion.

Jax

I think that is a very generalised statement made and in my situation it certainly wasn't true. For 25+ years we had 2 very good salaries coming in, very sudden ill health cuts the salary in half, but you still have all the same outgoings.
No one, and I mean no one wants to know when there could be a problem with not being able to pay.
GE Capital who are spme of the big boys behind Top Man, burtons, New Look etc who charge extreme APR and 2 of whose cards we had for many years were amongst the one defaulted on. They weren't interested, suddenly we had 2 CCJs, totalling £900 for the 2.
What a complete waste of time and money, have just paid them both off and quite frankly they can stay on the CRF as I don't want or need any credit from no one.................so to answer your question!! What do you think, do ya feel lucky today??

jax2503
08-02-2009, 16:21 PM
Mr Angry,

it depends on the situation of the claim, i'd say a standard money claim online claim is approx £100 dependant upon how much. If you get a sucessfull judgement then you either do a warrent of execution or a third party debt order which cost aprox £55, I feel only worth doing if they have assets or means to pay.

Hi Redex,

Apologies if I have upset you with my comments it was not my intentions, however my opinion still stands. However based upon your circumstances you were in a position of "cant pay, wont pay" and under that way I personally wouldnt have taken the matter to the county court. If people are in financial difficulty then help them not kick them. If on the other hand you have a tenant that is earning and just wont pay rent because they want to live rent free, slap them through the conty courts and send in the bailiffs.

Jax