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drramanjett
01-02-2009, 21:40 PM
tenant with a 2 year old moving in.

what should i go for carpets or laminate.

I think carpets would be the cheapest and if so what colour.

mind the gap
01-02-2009, 21:50 PM
tenant with a 2 year old moving in.

what should i go for carpets or laminate.

I think carpets would be the cheapest and if so what colour.

Laminate, unless the two year old is already toilet trained. (Unlikely). And laminate can be as cheap as carpet, if cheapness if crucial. £4 psm in IKEA or B & Q).

If you insist on having a carpet, try to find a kind of greyish/brown shade, with banana and Marmite coloured streaks in it.

Preston
01-02-2009, 22:10 PM
If you insist on having a carpet, try to find a kind of greyish/brown shade, .

Yep, I go for anything with "mushroom" in the title.

mind the gap
01-02-2009, 22:27 PM
Yep, I go for anything with "mushroom" in the title.

And 'mushroom soup', even better. Cut out the middle-man.

Rodent1
01-02-2009, 23:38 PM
Personally I would terracotta tile throughout -from front door to back door and let them buy their own rugs -more expensive to fit but only required once!

Standard issue for me!

Laminate is a pain in the bum, noisy and has to be swept several times a day and if you have any water problems on it ....it doesn't usually survive!

The Rodent

Cathroc
01-02-2009, 23:43 PM
Glad I didn't choose it, then.......... carpets for me, vinyl in the kitchen and bathroom :)

Rodent1
01-02-2009, 23:51 PM
Laminates, always (teracotta tiles??? whats that all about? heaven forbid you have a leaky water pipe you need to get to, etc.).



I was refering to Ground floor of property! With NO utilities buried underneath BUT in the unlikely event of a problem my experience tells me it is easier to replace a few local tiles, rather than have to pull up most of a laminate floor (been there !)

Bathrooms and upstairs kitchens i use professional gritted vinyl safety flooring (proper anti slip) not cheap but very durable and hard wearing and safe!



Cathroc - is this a house or flat Gf or higher ? what is existing floor timber, concrete etc?
The Rodent

mind the gap
02-02-2009, 06:40 AM
I was refering to Ground floor of property! With NO utilities buried underneath BUT in the unlikely event of a problem my experience tells me it is easier to replace a few local tiles, rather than have to pull up most of a laminate floor (been there !)The Rodent

I disagree, with every fibre of my being!

My only objection to cheap laminate is not that it will dissolve if it gets water on it (it doesn't - it takes a flood, which would wreck a carpet, too), but that it gets scratched and needs replacing more frequently - which is environmentally less desirable. Agree with Wickerman, we've had Aqualoc (more expensive) down in ground floors of student properties for some years now and never had a problem - still looks good and they certainly spill stuff on it....

Tiling is expensive to have put down, cold, a pain to have to smash to get up again, and unforgiving for small children. Ideal in kitchen & bathroom, not really anywhere else and if laid on floorboards, even with expensive sub-screed, usually cracks up.

Rodent1
02-02-2009, 13:10 PM
No reason why it needs to ever come up.
Easy to clean.
Large rugs make it more forgiving for kids.
Exp to lay but a long term solution.

Laminate just looks naff IMO

mind the gap
02-02-2009, 13:15 PM
No reason why it needs to ever come up.
Easy to clean.
Large rugs make it more forgiving for kids.
Exp to lay but a long term solution.

Laminate just looks naff IMO

So do lots of things, but some people like them and find them practical in certain contexts. Like those trays with built in cushions underneath. Or poodles. Which has just given me an idea for a new thread.

You will never get a perfect marriage of form and function which is also very cheap. In all design problems, there is generally a compromise to be struck. You can at best have two out of the three, most of the time.

jeffrey
02-02-2009, 13:26 PM
In all design problems, there is generally a compromise to be struck. You can at best have two out of the three, most of the time.
And two out of three ain't bad [(c) Mr Meatloaf].