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dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 09:04 AM
My previous landlord has made a statement to the police and has told them that I have stolen his oven.

The problem is that the day after my tenancy started I told the landlord that his oven was broken. I told him that I had an oven of my own that I could use and asked him if he wanted to collect his broken oven. He said that that was fine and he didn’t want the broken oven so I left it outside where it stayed for a week until the local scrap man spotted it and disposed of it for us. The conversation with the landlord regarding his broken oven took place over the telephone so unfortunately I have no written proof of this but my girlfriend can confirm the conversation as she was present.

After moving out of this property my landlord has decided to forget that his oven was disposed of on the second day of our tenancy as it was broken by previous tenants and has decided to try and get me charged with stealing his property.

There was no inventry in place, he took no deposit from us, he didnt ask us for references that he could check up on. So, he has taken no steps to protect himself and now that things have gone bad for him he feels that lying to the police is the way for him to go.

Poppy
30-09-2008, 09:18 AM
Did you leave an oven of any sort after vacating?

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 09:27 AM
Did you leave an oven of any sort after vacating?


Replacing items over wear and tear is not the problem here as his oven was broken by previous tenants. A tenancy agreement is not a new for old insurance policy and asking me to replace a broken oven on the second day of my tenancy is going a bit too far.

But to answer your question, no, there was no oven left of any sort after vacating. Learning from this experience has told me that i should have kept his broken oven until i moved out so that he could still be left with an oven. But then with this mans personality i would still be looking at replacing his oven that he would now be saying that i broke.

Poppy
30-09-2008, 09:33 AM
Oh dear! Total lack of communication between y'all.

On the face of it, you have not even left the ex-landlord with an oven that he can repair if he so chose.

Wouldn't you be annoyed if you were in your ex-landlord's shoes?

Going to the Police is not really the answer.

Mars Mug
30-09-2008, 09:34 AM
I would be surprised if the police took any interest in this, it sounds like a civil matter to me.

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 09:48 AM
Unfortunatly the police did were involved. Myself and my gf were both arrested, interviewed, photographed, had fingerprints and DNA samples taken and were released on bail. My GF feels violated for having to give her DNA and fingerprints just because of somebody elses lies. She also risked losing her job as she cannot have a criminal record.

Poppy
30-09-2008, 09:50 AM
So, how do you propose to resolve the situation with your ex-landlord?

mind the gap
30-09-2008, 10:01 AM
Replacing items over wear and tear is not the problem here as his oven was broken by previous tenants. A tenancy agreement is not a new for old insurance policy and asking me to replace a broken oven on the second day of my tenancy is going a bit too far.

But to answer your question, no, there was no oven left of any sort after vacating. Learning from this experience has told me that i should have kept his broken oven until i moved out so that he could still be left with an oven. But then with this mans personality i would still be looking at replacing his oven that he would now be saying that i broke.

I think this tenant has been treated unfairly by the LL. Since the police have been involved and T has (it seems) admitted getting rid of the old broken oven with no written proof that LL allowed that, I think T only has three options (despite the fact there is no inventory, which would normally get him off the hook).

1.Leave the new oven that T himself purchased, in situ.
2. Buy a new oven for the property and leave that
3. Buy a second hand oven (not necessarily working) - buy/scrounge one from the council tip if need be - and leave that behind instead. He is not obliged to replace original item with something better.

Needless to say, I would be going for option 3.

The LL had a duty to provide a working oven and failed to do that. T helped him out of a hole and is now being punished for it. Morally T owes LL nothing, in fact, LL owes T.

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 10:06 AM
I am aghast....you cannot accept this. That arrest will stay on your file forever. There is absolutely no way I would be buying any oven - you may as well admit your guilt. Get all the proof you can - do you know who the scrap man was? Did anyone see the oven outside? Do you have at least phone records to prove calls were made? What I do not understand is what the LL hopes to gain; he has "lost" a broken oven. Ovens cost buttons 2nd hand. Why go to all this trouble. And the Police? I am sorry but I find it almost impossible to believe they would get involved. It is your word against the LLs. I would be jumping up and down and sueing for wrongful arrest - that is unless there is more to this story that you are telling us...
And as a Magistrate myself I can't see how the CPS can take this forward? Have you spoken to a good CRIMINAL solicitor (specialist)? If not, do so, NOW!

Poppy
30-09-2008, 10:21 AM
If your story is accurate dazza-uk, it is a pity that the Police have seen fit to take the course of action they have so far.

To other tenants with non-working appliances - you must insist in writing to your landlord that the appliance is repaired. Always resolve the matter amicably and with the co-operation of your landlord. If your landlord does not act quickly enough for your liking, write again stating that you will have the appliance repaired and deduct the cost from the rent.

If matters are remain unresolved you should vacate the property at the end of your tenancy.

Do not throw out other people's property, unless express permission in writing is given. CYA - cover your arse!

oaktree
30-09-2008, 10:28 AM
Unfortunatly the police did were involved. Myself and my gf were both arrested, interviewed, photographed, had fingerprints and DNA samples taken and were released on bail. My GF feels violated for having to give her DNA and fingerprints just because of somebody elses lies. She also risked losing her job as she cannot have a criminal record.

That seems a bit excessive just for an oven that the landlord couldn't prove was in the property via an inventory. Is that all you were charged with or were there other elements to the charge?

I think this confirms yet again that it is vital to keep records of communication between parties especially when it involves removing the landlords goods from a property, whether working or not.

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 10:30 AM
Poppy and Oaktree - you are absolutely right. I look forward to further info from dazza-uk

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 10:34 AM
I am aghast....you cannot accept this. That arrest will stay on your file forever. There is absolutely no way I would be buying any oven - you may as well admit your guilt. Get all the proof you can - do you know who the scrap man was? Did anyone see the oven outside? Do you have at least phone records to prove calls were made? What I do not understand is what the LL hopes to gain; he has "lost" a broken oven. Ovens cost buttons 2nd hand. Why go to all this trouble. And the Police? I am sorry but I find it almost impossible to believe they would get involved. It is your word against the LLs. I would be jumping up and down and sueing for wrongful arrest - that is unless there is more to this story that you are telling us...
And as a Magistrate myself I can't see how the CPS can take this forward? Have you spoken to a good CRIMINAL solicitor (specialist)? If not, do so, NOW!

In a nutshell we moved into a property, threw away a broken oven, moved out and get arrested for stealing his oven. The police did say that they expect the CPS to throw it out but then i still have the future hassle of him trying this in the civil courts.

I did not post this here for sympathy i just want to tell it so that people can read and learn from my mistake.

Poppy
30-09-2008, 10:38 AM
You have not answered my question dazza-uk. I'll modify it.

How do you propose to resolve the situation with your ex-landlord, so that your problems are not compounded by civil legal action?

mind the gap
30-09-2008, 10:45 AM
I am aghast....you cannot accept this. That arrest will stay on your file forever. There is absolutely no way I would be buying any oven - you may as well admit your guilt. Get all the proof you can - do you know who the scrap man was? Did anyone see the oven outside? Do you have at least phone records to prove calls were made?

Presumably all this has been gone through and OP has told the police what he did with the oven. There would be no point now in saying 'It's his word against mine' - sounds as if T has admitted that he disposed of the oven without written permission. I agree it's ridiculous but what's done is done. He cannot now claim he didn't get rid of it - is that what you are suggesting?

Whether he got rid of it to a scrap merchant or to his granny in Australia is immaterial.

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 10:46 AM
You have not answered my question dazza-uk. I'll modify it.

How do you propose to resolve the situation with your ex-landlord, so that your problems are not compounded by civil legal action?

Unfortunatly this is cannot be resolved yet as we are still on bail. We actually live in north wales now and have been bailed to a police station in the west midlands. Four police officers traveled 120 miles to arrest us at 6am! The petrol expenses and time off work that this is going to cost us will end up costing more than a small number of broken and worthless ovens. Untill we get an answer from the CPO i think its safe to say we are still considered gulity. When and if we are released without charge will be the time for us to resolve this.

Mars Mug
30-09-2008, 10:47 AM
I don’t see why the police saw grounds to arrest. The landlord would have been able to show them where an oven used to be, but beyond that he could not prove ownership or that there ever was an oven there that he owned. I assume you could show that you originally purchased the oven that you took away. If it’s a built in electric oven I can’t see the point of pursuing it through the courts, they only cost about £150 and are easily replaced.

What would stop a landlord from providing a house with some other item not included such as a dishwasher, fridge, TV, stereo etc. and then claiming them as his own when the tenant moves out, and as in this case contacting the police? Surely a signed inventory is the normal way to go? How can the police be so sure to arrest unless the OP admitted dumping the oven and replacing it with their own, which they later removed? Even then is that a clear case of thieft?

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 11:01 AM
I don’t see why the police saw grounds to arrest. The landlord would have been able to show them where an oven used to be, but beyond that he could not prove ownership or that there ever was an oven there that he owned. I assume you could show that you originally purchased the oven that you took away. If it’s a built in electric oven I can’t see the point of pursuing it through the courts, they only cost about £150 and are easily replaced.

I do not have a receipt for my oven as i have had it years. A number of our family members can confirm that our oven is actually ours because they have seen it along with other items of ours that we have owned over a number of years before we had even met this landlord. The actual oven that he accused us of stealing was brown, ours in stainless steel. The police showed me photos of an oven that belongs to his neighbour who had the same oven. All houses in that terace all have the same identical kitchens and appliances as they were all new build 8 yrs ago, none of them refurbished. He cant say our oven is his becuase he has produced photos and descriptions of a totally different make and colour oven.

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 11:17 AM
Hi Mind the Gap - since when did it become illegal to dispose of something with the owners permission? It is one person's word against the other person's...not something Police would usually touch with a bargepole!
Mars Mug - I also cannot see how it is "theft". Legal definition of theft:
‘the dishonest appropriation of property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving that person of it’.
Comment by Police: Put simply this means, taking someone else’s property intending that it will not be returned. There needs to be an element of dishonesty. If someone believes they have a right to take property or the owner would have consented this could mean that a theft has not been committed.
So, given the above, none of this stacks up.
In your place I would
a) go see a solicitor
b) make an urgent application for variation of bail conditions to live and reside at your CURRENT address - this can be done quickly and easily through the Magistrates court
c) be keeping all travel receipts etc with a view to claiming costs of LL through small claims when this nonsense is over
d) writing to chief constable about the matter
e) if no joy, getting the press involved. This is a great tabloid story - people being killed left right and centre and the police wasting all this money and time on an oven....!
This does not stack up and someone has made a very big mistake.....

Mars Mug
30-09-2008, 11:19 AM
I can only assume that the police arrested you because you explained what happened and their view of the legality of this was not what you expected? Otherwise as I suggested above, what would have stopped your landlord from dumping the broken oven after you moved out (had it still been there of course) and taking exactly the same action?

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 11:21 AM
Clearly the view of the Police is not the view of the Law either, given my quote above... take action dazza-uk. Do nothing and you will be the victim in all this.

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 11:31 AM
I can only assume that the police arrested you because you explained what happened and their view of the legality of this was not what you expected? Otherwise as I suggested above, what would have stopped your landlord from dumping the broken oven after you moved out (had it still been there of course) and taking exactly the same action?


I have no ideal why we were arrested. My Gf wakes me up just after 6am to tell me there are four police officers standing in our living room and they are here to arrest us because our ex landlord has told them that we have stolen his cooker. I go down stairs and tell the police exactly what heppened to the broken cooker. They said there and then that it looked like a civil matter before even carting us off in a riot van to the local police station. They took a photo of our own oven which was obviously not the one that we are accused of stealing. We are taken in, interviewed and bailed.

Im pretty sure the police believe what happened to the broken oven as while i was being interviewed they moved on from theft and started going on and on about the part in the tenancy agreement that states that i have to replace items that are broken due to wear and tear. This isnt wear and tear as it was broke before i moved in. Even that isnt important as i wasnt arrested for breaking the terms of a tenancy agreement i was there because i had been accused of theft.

Mars Mug
30-09-2008, 11:36 AM
That all sounds pretty stupid, the landlord could have just as easily taken a photo of his pushbike and accused you of stealing that. It doesn’t sound to me like there’s evidence for arrest without your own verification of at least some of the ‘facts’. Without an inventory the wear and tear of goods argument won’t go far in court.

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 12:11 PM
It won't get to court I expect but the arrest is on your file forever. Get it expunged. Write to the chief constable and get legal advice. Threaten to sue for wrongful arrest - kick up a fuss or you will suffer...
the Police do not care at all what is in an AST - I can't help thinking there must be more to it than this. We can't fight it for you Dazza - what are you going to do?

agent46
30-09-2008, 12:17 PM
e) if no joy, getting the press involved. This is a great tabloid story - people being killed left right and centre and the police wasting all this money and time on an oven....!


That's good advice, because apart from anything else, as the incident may stay on your file - and with the way things are going, God only knows what sort of information will be available to whom and in what circumstances in a few years - it would be useful to have a back story/explanation to reel off to employers if they ever find out about it. Rather than trying to explain your side of the story at length to a suspicious employer (which may well just make you look guilty), you can breezily say "It was all a huge fuss over nothing, the Police were a bunch of idiots, and it even made it into the papers - have a look at this newspaper clipping for yourself."

justaboutsane
30-09-2008, 16:23 PM
HELLO... Did ANYONE read the original Post???

The OP states there was NO INVENTORY!! Landlord needs to PROVE the oven was there and how can he with no inventory!!

OP call the local police and ask for evidence that there was an oven in situ! Mind you I guess you have already said that there was and you binned it ....

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 16:49 PM
justaboutsane - the OP has been treated badly (if we have the whole story) and if it were me I would not take it lying down. However we can't make him see a solicitor/write to the chief constable/go to the press. Over to you Dazza...

agent46
30-09-2008, 16:53 PM
HELLO... Did ANYONE read the original Post???

The OP states there was NO INVENTORY!! Landlord needs to PROVE the oven was there and how can he with no inventory!!

OP call the local police and ask for evidence that there was an oven in situ! Mind you I guess you have already said that there was and you binned it ....

Firstly, the landlord doesn't have to prove anything. The prosecution do, however. Just thought I should clear that up.

Secondly, I doubt the presence/ownership of the oven is in dispute.

If the LL did not give OP persmission to throw it away, then OP has appropriated the oven (ie: exercised rights in connection with the property consistent with ownership). However, if this was done eg: in the honest but mistaken belief that the LL had given such permission, then the appropriation was not dishonest. In simple terms, this case hinges on whether the Crown can prove OP's dishonesty beyond reasonable doubt. IF what OP has said is true, then I would be very very surprised indeed if he is charged, and in the unlikely event that he is, I can't see any reasonable and properly directed Magistrates or jury convicting.

boredbird
30-09-2008, 17:14 PM
Yet another case of police misusing their time and resources. The theft of an old oven, does not need policemen who should be doing better things with their time, than arresting people, taking fingerprints and DNA..............this isnt a murder case, why did that take all that. Go to your local paper, the landlord will be humiliated as will the police.

Ericthelobster
30-09-2008, 18:13 PM
Unfortunatly this is cannot be resolved yet as we are still on bail. We actually live in north wales now and have been bailed to a police station in the west midlands. Four police officers traveled 120 miles to arrest us at 6am!That is just too bizarre for words... even if the OP was guilty of what the LL had claimed, what on earth is all this about? Quite apart from the distance involved, why the need for a dawn raid with four officers?

There surely has to be more to this story, even if it's only that the LL does funny handshakes with the chief constable.

mind the gap
30-09-2008, 18:21 PM
That is just too bizarre for words... even if the OP was guilty of what the LL had claimed, what on earth is all this about? Quite apart from the distance involved, why the need for a dawn raid with four officers?

There surely has to be more to this story, even if it's only that the LL does funny handshakes with the chief constable.

I agree. Sounds likes the plot for a 'Miss Marple'.

'The Mystery of the Brown Oven'.

Perhaps not!

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 19:49 PM
A couple of people have said that there could be more to this story and yes there is. I wanted to tell the story about the alleged theft of an oven first as this is what we have been wrongly accused of. I shall now tell the rest and let the landlords on here make up their own minds about my Gf and myself.

On July 28th I took my Gf to north wales for a job interview. She was applying for a job as a care home manager. She was offered the job there and then but was told that she would need to start work in 6 days time as the current manager was leaving. So she accepts the job and we go off to buy a newspaper to find somewhere to live. We find an amazing cottage, pay our deposit and are handed the keys. Over the next two days we move our belongings out of the property in the midlands.

At this time we still have four weeks left on our current tenancy in the midlands. On the 2nd august I return to the midlands to collect our blinds, a ladder and marble hearth and fire surround that we couldn’t fit into the van. In my back pocket is a months rent and a letter for the landlord explaining the situation.

I get to the house that I had rented from him and I find that the locks had been changed. His reply to this is that we have always paid our rent a week early every month and this month he hadn’t received his rent early. So he went to the house on the rent due date (1st aug') , looked through the letterbox and couldn’t see any furniture. So he let himself in with his key and changed the locks.

So with that the last months rent that we owe him is in my back pocket and there it stayed. His rent is actually still in the same envelope in a safe with me. He has never asked me for this amount and he has even told the police that their is no dispute about money owed. If he had I would have handed it over.

He waited until sept 1st before accusing us of stealing his broken oven as this was the day that our tenancy would have ended. He couldn’t accuse me before this date because legally I still had a right to access the property.

So yes I admit we probably should have told him we was moving on the day of the move but as we had a month left on our tenancy and had full intention of paying up the remaining month left on the tenancy we saw no problem in leaving it 2 days while we moved our belongings.

But no we didnt steal his oven, he was informed on the second day of our tenancy that it was broke and he advised us that he didn’t want it, he didn’t offer to supply us one through our tenancy and neither did he state that he wanted us to leave him our own oven.

He is not disputing that we owe him a months rent as he has admitted that he illegally took possession of his property. He changed the locks before I got there with his due rent and a letter stating that we were vacating his property.

We thought nothing else of this, we couldn’t have cared less really that he had illegally evicted us as it was in the past now. No mention of ovens for 7 weeks after our departure. Then he goes to the police and tells pokies.

Now im guessing that 99% of the members here will take side with the landlord and say that they don’t blame him for thinking up a way of getting us back, and if that’s so that’s fine as every one is entitled to their opinion. Our issue with the landlord isn’t about ending our tenancy early or throwing away a broken oven it’s about being wrongly accused of theft which he knows full well that what happened to it.

mind the gap
30-09-2008, 19:57 PM
I believe you, but I still don't understand why the police came storming all the way to North Wales from the Midlands as if you were the Great Train Robbers or something?

dazza-uk
30-09-2008, 20:11 PM
I believe you, but I still don't understand why the police came storming all the way to North Wales from the Midlands as if you were the Great Train Robbers or something?

Thank you and thank you for not saying that you dont blame the LL for trying to get us back some way or another.

If it does go to court we are considering doing him for illegal eviction ( im sure that many on here are aware that its a huge fine or the risk of prison), plus he has no gas safety records. Wasting police time, wrongful arrest, he still has a few of our own possesions.... all over a broken 8 yr old electric oven.

This really is the whole story, 100%. There really is no more that i can add.

mind the gap
30-09-2008, 20:16 PM
Thank you and thank you for not saying that you dont blame the LL for trying to get us back some way or another.

If it does go to court we are considering doing him for illegal eviction ( im sure that many on here are aware that its a huge fine or the risk of prison), plus he has no gas safety records. Wasting police time, wrongful arrest, he still has a few of our own possesions.... all over a broken 8 yr old electric oven.

This really is the whole story, 100%. There really is no more that i can add.

On the basis of what you have told us, you seem to have a much stronger case than your LL. I don't know how far a court would be influenced by the fact that he has had you arrested for alleged theft, but if I were in your shoes, I would be chucking the book at him. Good luck.

islandgirl
30-09-2008, 20:49 PM
dazza - whatever you did or did not do there is no excuse for your LLs behaviour. By the way I am a LL and don't see what you did wrong exactly? Even if you were 2 days "late" with the rent he cannot enter by law and had no right whatsoever to change the locks. But can you prove he did? If so, you can take him to the cleaners...LLs are not all horrible you know - I am on your side on this one!
But Dazza I can't tell you how important it is that you get back to the police and make an official complaint and ask for the arrest record to be expunged. You will have to live with this forever if you don't. Trust me. Get legal advice - criminal solicitor - you may qualify for legal aid and at the very least the first interview should be free. I am a member of a legal forum - you could try that and see what the members think of your story - pm me if you want details. Good luck.

Mars Mug
01-10-2008, 08:24 AM
HELLO... Did ANYONE read the original Post???

The OP states there was NO INVENTORY!! Landlord needs to PROVE the oven was there and how can he with no inventory!!

HELLO... I think I raised that point twice ;)


Now im guessing that 99% of the members here will take side with the landlord and say that they don’t blame him for thinking up a way of getting us back.

I think you will find you have more support than you expect, good landlords on this forum have little time for bad landlords, especially when they break the law.

Do you have any evidence of when locks were changed etc?

dazza-uk
01-10-2008, 12:54 PM
There is evidence that the locks were changed, its contained in the LL's own statement to the police regarding the theft of his oven which was read out to me and my Gf while we were being qesitioned seperatly.

In his recorded statment he says ' I always considered them good tenants because their rent was always early. On the first day of the month (rent due day) i thought there was a problem so i went to the house and looked through the letterbox. I could not see any furniture so i let myself in with my own key. They did not tell me that they were moving out and never returned the keys. So i had to change the locks which has also cost me a few quid.'

At the the time of the interview it never clicked in my head that he was admiting that he let himself in a few days before i returned to the property to give notice and pay up the last months rent. If it had i would have made a statement of my own there and then regarding his illegal eviction.

islandgirl
01-10-2008, 17:35 PM
No time to lose...you can still do it!

Subway
01-10-2008, 19:49 PM
There is evidence that the locks were changed, its contained in the LL's own statement to the police regarding the theft of his oven which was read out to me and my Gf while we were being qesitioned seperatly.

In his recorded statment he says ' I always considered them good tenants because their rent was always early. On the first day of the month (rent due day) i thought there was a problem so i went to the house and looked through the letterbox. I could not see any furniture so i let myself in with my own key. They did not tell me that they were moving out and never returned the keys. So i had to change the locks which has also cost me a few quid.'

At the the time of the interview it never clicked in my head that he was admiting that he let himself in a few days before i returned to the property to give notice and pay up the last months rent. If it had i would have made a statement of my own there and then regarding his illegal eviction.

So your landlord is saying he didn't even give you until the end of the day your rent was due before changing the locks on your home?? The stupidity of some people can't be believed both in doing it and in admitting it in a police record! Do you have this now in writing? If there was a Darwin award for landlords this tale would have to be nominated!!

agent46
01-10-2008, 20:13 PM
At the the time of the interview it never clicked in my head that he was admiting that he let himself in a few days before i returned to the property to give notice and pay up the last months rent. If it had i would have made a statement of my own there and then regarding his illegal eviction.

If I were you I'd give him a taste of his own medicine (and dissuade him from doing the same to others) by reporting him to the tenancy protection team at your local council and also suing him in the civil courts for amongst other things, trespass, breach of quiet enjoyment and unlawful eviction.

His statement to the Police is a confession and not only should that be passed to the tenancy protection bods, but you could summons the Police Officer to either give evidence in your civil case and/or give you a transcript of the interview.

sharonb
16-10-2010, 09:14 AM
hi I have just read all about this dispute with the landlord accusing this tenant of theft, the same thing has happened to my son, and we dont know what to do. my son moved out of this property after giving the landlord his notice, he didnt need to pay a deposit only 6 weeks rent in advance when he moved in, so he only had to give 2 weeks notice to move out, which he did, the landlord asked him to move out within the 1st week so he could re-lent the property, and return a weeks rent to him, but after another week my son received a phone call from the police saying there are going to prosacute him for theft of a washing machine, the washing machine in the property broke and was replaced with a newer one, the old one was placed outside along with other items from the house which the landlord said he would dispose of. the previous tenants had left alot of old furniture and stuff and the landlord said anything they didnt want, just put outside and he would dispose of it, which is what my son did.

Jennifer
16-10-2010, 10:38 AM
I dislike this trend towards taking a DNA sample from someone the instant they are accused of some virtually non existant crime. I would be straight on to the independent police complaints commission.

Dazza, don't leave this for the sake of a quiet life, this could follow you and your g/f round for life.

BTW I'm a LL too, and think this is utterly unreasonable

Ericthelobster
16-10-2010, 10:45 AM
Me? I don't know anything about anything. Including the use of internet forums perchance?

(Tip - look at the date of posts you're responding too...) ;)

property mongrel
16-10-2010, 16:18 PM
Sharon B (post 42)

Don't do anything. Your son need not do anything either. Wait awhile and maybe the LL will make a demand for some money in compensation for the supposedly "stolen washing machine".

IF the LL does make a demand, then come back here and tell us what he says or does, preferably before replying to him.

You state that the Police telephoned your son and informed him that they are going to prosecute him for theft of the washing machine. Who at the police? What number did they call him on and from? What exactly did they say as far as your son can recall?

At this stage you and your son have absolutely nothing to worry about regarding the washing machine matter, nothing at all. The police will not telephone to tell your son that they are going to prosecute him, the law does not work like this.

Enjoy the rest of the weekend.

pm