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View Full Version : Do I have to leave the heating on in the damp rooms in my flat?



todj
05-12-2005, 16:41 PM
The flat I live in has, in the past, (before I moved in) had a damp problem in the bathroom and toilet.

The landlord's answer to this is to hardwire two oil-filled radiators into the electricity supply (perfectly safely, I should add - not in a dodgey way) and leave them on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

This is a good solution for him, as it means his property doesn't deteriorate, but it's muggins here who has to pay for the electricity.

I'm thinking of asking the landlord to pay a contribution. Is that reasonable, and if he refuses would have I any legal recourse?

Jennifer_M
05-12-2005, 17:12 PM
If that's the way the property was when you visited it and agreed to rent it then I would think the landlord doesn't have to do anything more.

To save electricity you could switch them off.

cris/c
05-12-2005, 18:15 PM
By 'hardwired' I presume you have no means of switching them off, or adjusting temperature control etc.,

I'm not sure that you would have neccessarily been aware of this when you viewed the property.

However, oil filled rads don't use a great deal of electricity when they are running effieciently. It might be worth having a polite word with the LL not to ask for a contribution in the first instance, but just to raise concerns about the running costs of the rads.

My son and his wife use two oil filled rads in the evenings to boost the heat before the night storage heaters kick in. They set them on 'low' and have not noticed a significant rise in electricity usage. They are supposed to operate for as little as 1p per hour.

I must admit, I would prefer not to have the damp return either as a LL or a tenant, but it seems a bit unfair to me that you have no means of switching off the heat.

catcuddler
05-12-2005, 18:59 PM
But if you're wiring in a fixed appliance, which is what this will be, then it should have an fcu or DP switch wired in before the appliance, so that the supply can be isolated? Therefore if this is done, it can be switched off on demand.

This is of course the case with new electricl systems - eg boiler connection, hob ignition. Does the new building reg Part P or whatever its called also demand this of additions (whichis what this is) to existing circuits?

I tmay be worth finding this out: if it does demand an isolating switch for a wired in appliance, then you can remind the landlord of this.....

If you go screwfix.com chatboards, I'm sure you'll get it clarified as to whether there should be a switch.

todj
06-12-2005, 09:53 AM
They were pointed out to me *after* I signed the agreement. I was told at that time they were low-level heaters, but having seen my heating bill I'm not so sure!

By hardwired I mean they are wired straight into a junction box (is that what they're called) on the wall, so there's no facility to turn them off either at the socket or on the radiators themselves.

Jennifer_M
06-12-2005, 11:45 AM
By hardwired I mean they are wired straight into a junction box (is that what they're called) on the wall, so there's no facility to turn them off either at the socket or on the radiators themselves.

:confused: So you can't actually turn them off even in summer ?? You could ask the landlord to have a thermostat put in so you can switch them off when they are not needed.

catcuddler
07-12-2005, 19:34 PM
So, if the Jbox is on the wall, it's visible and able to be accessed? If so, then the cable can be run instead to a fused connection unit or DP switch, and then run on to the fixed appliance?

Ericthelobster
07-12-2005, 19:48 PM
By hardwired I mean they are wired straight into a junction box (is that what they're called) on the wall, so there's no facility to turn them off either at the socket or on the radiators themselves.Presumably not a "junction box" as such; those are only for fixed wiring (ie not to appliances). Is it something like this? http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=101470&ts=84482&id=29775 To be legit, there should at least be a fuse where the rads connect, and that can be pulled to break the circuit. But be careful, as the circuit will be live; should be fine and safe to do. but without knowing exactly what's been installed I thought I'd better mention it!

Alternatively, possibly (but unlikely!) it's been wired on a dedicated circuit from the consumer unit (or fusebox) and you might be able to isolate the rads by flicking a tripswitch in there?