PDA

View Full Version : Letting agents & gas safety



caroline7758
05-11-2005, 14:48 PM
Just a warning to anyone who lets through an agent. We took our property out of the hands of a letting agent 9 months ago. We have just had a gas safety check done and were informed of a fault which needed seeing to and which must have existed in the time the letting agents had the checks done for us. We were never informed of the problem, but would no doubt have been held liable had anything happened as a result of the fault. If you use an agent, make sure you get a copy of the gas safety certificate yourself.

Paul_f
06-11-2005, 20:54 PM
Hold on Caroline! You're not being anywhere near objective! If the GSC was carried out by a CORGI Engineer at the outset and a Certificate issued then there is no problem. Just because something has come to light now doesn't make you retrospectively liable as the "duty of care" was undertaken by the agent. How do you know that the fault must have been evident at the time? You haven't in fact said if a safety check was carried out. Facts are essential when posting such "information". A warning it wasn't! Scaremongering more like!

Poppy
07-11-2005, 09:17 AM
Surely, having a gas safety check does not automatically mean that the boiler has been serviced? I never make that assumption.

Energise
07-11-2005, 10:06 AM
We have just had a gas safety check done and were informed of a fault which needed seeing to and which must have existed in the time the letting agents had the checks done for us.


Different Corgi Engineers judge things differently, one might pass something that another may not.

P.Pilcher
07-11-2005, 10:20 AM
Regrettably, there are some Corgi registered engineers who regard their qualification as a licence to print money and act accordingly. To be fair, the qualification requires a considerable amount of study, written examinations, experience in gasfitting and repeated assessment by Corgi themselves. I sometimes refer to my "tame" Corgi registered gasfitter. This is because he is sensible, charges a fair fee for his services on taking into account the above and I can respect his advice (some of which has been repeated on this forum.) He is the type of Corgi registered engineer that all landlords should try to find and use if they can.

P.P.

red40
07-11-2005, 10:38 AM
Surely, having a gas safety check does not automatically mean that the boiler has been serviced? I never make that assumption.

That is very true poppy, the landlords gas safety check and a gas appliance service are two different things. The landlords gas check is, as we know annual, however a gas appliance service should be carried out under a landlords obligations for on-going maintenance.

caroline7758
07-11-2005, 12:33 PM
I didn't give details before as I was making a general point. But the problem was with the position of the boiler- it and the outside flue were both closer to the window than allowed, - and since neither the boiler nor the window have moved since we bought the house, it must have been the same last year! Our "tame" gas fitter got round it by screwing the window shut (with the tenant's permission) and rang me at once to explain about the danger from fumes if the window is open.

dazalock
07-11-2005, 13:53 PM
The flue in my roof is not the right size for todays regs, but was acceptable when it was installed. As such, the Boiler is legal so long as I dont replace it, at which time I would have to have a larger Flue installed!

Maybe your boiler conformed at the time it was installed, and therefore is legal. :confused:

caroline7758
09-11-2005, 19:54 PM
I'll definitely look into that, as my gas fitter tells me that to replace the boiler under the new regs related to energy efficiency would cost around £1500! :eek:

lucid
10-11-2005, 00:58 AM
I believe all new boliers have to be of the condenser type, and require a greater level of maintenance thus greater expense. I was also told they are not as reliable as older types. Anyway I'm no expert on this just passing on the info from a man who is.

:)

P.Pilcher
10-11-2005, 14:25 PM
I understand that Condensing type boilers have to be fitted unless providing the necessary drain e.t.c would be impractical when an older typr boiler can still be fitted.

P.P.

red40
10-11-2005, 16:36 PM
As from the 1st April 2005, a number of revisions where made to the building regulations Approved Document L1, from the 1st April 2005 where a new or replacement boiler is to be installed, it generally must be a condensing boiler. For boiler installations in existing dwellings Appendix G of the building regulations has been added, which sets out the procedure for determining for the purposes of L1 where due to practical considerations / restrictions it would be unreasonable to install a non-condensing boiler.

If your installer advises you that it would be unreasonable to install a condensing boiler in your property, the installer must complete a declaration form for you to keep with the commissioning certificate. CORGI Gas installers started issuing these relevant forms since 1st April 2005 where appropriate.

If your gas installer doesn’t fit a condensing boiler the householders must receive and retain the above forms from the installer, as they will be necessary for any house sale process and will be required to prove Building Regulation compliance.

The assessment should be carried out in accordance with the Guide to the Condensing Boiler Installation Assessment Procedure for Dwellings issued by the ODPM.

caroline7758
10-11-2005, 19:41 PM
That's right, Lucid- some info here:
http://www.britishgasnews.co.uk/index.asp?PageID=16&Year=2005&NewsID=663

lucid
10-11-2005, 23:40 PM
Thanks Caroline useful link.

:)